February 17, 2016 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

Reinhard Gehlen, the Friendly Nazi

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

Good guys doing good, bad guys doing bad and, in the very serious waning days of World War II in Europe and after some initial moments of clarity, complete and total confusion about who was who. Into this heady confusion steps Nazi Reinhard Gehlen, a Wehrmacht major general and man with a plan so compelling that after the Allies announced victory on June 5, 1945, he found himself employed in the U.S. three months later.

The plan? The formation of the Gehlen Organization from the still-smoking embers of the Nazi intelligence agency — designed to bury the Soviets and fueled by intelligence assets Gehlen had hidden all over the Alps and Bavaria.

Which, if you think about it, was a bold move for a guy who had already used up a few of his nine lives. Gehlen barely escaped after being involved in the attempted assassination of Adolf Hitler and the reprisals that followed, making him the perfect man to have the plan. His Foreign Armies East gave him a deep understanding of what theSoviets had been up to, despite the fact that his assessments were routinely dismissed by Hitler as “defeatist.” But Gehlen was as grim about German war prospects before the cessation of hostilities as he was positively “upbeat” about America’s prospects after them. Specifically with an eye toward getting as many ex-SS and ex-Wehrmacht officers hired as possible.

Getting hired put them on the payroll instead of on trial. But for this to make sense today you have to remember that the postwar setting was crazy. There was espionage and counterespionage in the Soviet satellites, the partitioning of East Germany to the Soviets and West Germany to the U.S., Britain and France, as well as President Harry S. Truman’s Operation Paperclip, which brought more than 1,500 German scientists and engineers over to the U.S. — all of which largely meant you couldn’t keep track of the players without a scorecard. Moreover, although Truman had demanded that anyone hired not be Nazis, members of the Nazi party or Nazi sympathizers, this demand was roundly ignored and the truth possibly hidden from Truman himself but most certainly from the American public.

And the scorecard from Gehlen’s perspective amounted to a 1948 annual budget of roughly $14.7 million in today’s dollars. Not bad for an organization that eight years later grew to about 4,000 people, was absorbed into a legitimate German agency, the Federal Intelligence Service, that exists to this day and that kept Gehlen employed until he was forced into retirement in 1968. The Germans gave him a pension when he retired and, allegedly, so did the Americans.

“For as generally unsuccessful as Gehlen was,” said David H. Lippman, author of World War II Plus 75: The Road to War, referring to Gehlen’s most notable failure (the infiltration by Soviet agents, which got him dismissed in 1968), “he was pretty successful. And a very shadowy character, like most spymasters.”

Success can be defined in many ways, but a former Nazi general dying comfortably at 77, in 1979, unprosecuted for anything related to the war years or his rumored involvement in the assassination of John F. Kennedy — most notably cited by Dick Russell in his critically acclaimed almost-600-page book, The Man Who Knew Too Much — certainly ranks right up there.

According to a New York Times article published in June 1927, a man with the name and address of Donald Trump’s father was arraigned after Klan members attacked cops in Queens, N.Y.

In an article subtitled “Klan assails policeman”, Fred Trump is named in among those taken in during a late May “battle” in which “1,000 Klansmen and 100 policemen staged a free-for-all.” At least two officers were hurt during the event, after which the Klan’s activities were denounced by the city’s Police Commissioner, Joseph A. Warren.

“The Klan not only wore gowns, but had hoods over their faces almost completely hiding their identity,” Warren was quoted as saying in the article, which goes on to identify seven men “arrested in the near-riot of the parade.”

Named alongside Trump are John E Kapp and John Marcy (charged with felonious assault in the attack on Patrolman William O’Neill and Sgt. William Lockyear), Fred Lyons, Thomas Caroll, Thomas Erwin, and Harry J Free. They were arraigned in Jamaica, N.Y. All seven were represented by the same lawyers, according to the article.

The final entry on the list reads: “Fred Trump of 175-24 Devonshire Road, Jamaica, was discharged.”

In 1927, Donald Trump’s father would have been 21 years old, and not yet a well-known figure. Multiple sources report his residence at the time—and throughout his life—at the same address.

To be clear, this is not proof that Trump senior—who would later go on to become a millionaire real estate developer—was a member of the Ku Klux Klan or even in attendance at the event. Despite sharing lawyers with the other men, it’s conceivable that he may have been an innocent bystander, falsely named, or otherwise the victim of mistaken identity during or following a chaotic event.

The name of Trump’s grandfather, Friedrich Drumpf, was anglicized to Frederick Trump, but he died several years before the report.

A person answering calls at the N.Y.C. Police Department’s Records Section said that arrest reports dating that far back were not available in any form. We’ve sent a formal request in writing and will update if and when we receive a response. We’ve also left a message with the Trump Campaign requesting a callback.

The article, published on June 1, 1927, describes police frustration at rowdy parades, the Klan’s use of masks, and its growing presence in New York City. The Klan, originally founded in the 19th century, was reborn in 1915 as a violent supremacist organization associated with lynchings, white nationalism, and the distinctive white robes and hoods used by Klansmen to conceal their identity at parades and other events. At its mid-1920s peak, it had up to 6m members, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Fred Trump, who died in 1999, was a New York real estate developer and the father of mogul and presidential candidate Donald Trump. Born in the Bronx to German immigrants, Fred became a real estate developer in his teens; at about the time of his apparent arrest, he was constructing single-family houses in Queens, according to his obituary in the Times. At his death, his net worth was estimated at between $250m and $300m. A savvy businessman and real estate developer, his wealth enabled the junior Trump to start big.

If the man arrested at the riotous Klan parade was indeed Donald’s father, it would not be his last tangle with the law over issues concerning minorities. A 1979 article, published by Village Voice, reported on a civil rights suit that alleged that the Trumps refused to rent to black home-seekers, and quotes a rental agent who said Fred Trump instructed him not to rent to blacks and to encourage existing black tenants to leave. The case was settled in a 1975 consent degree described as “one of the most far-reaching ever negotiated,” but the Justice Department subsequently complained that continuing “racially discriminatory conduct by Trump agents has occurred with such frequency that it has created a substantial impediment to the full enjoyment of equal opportunity.”

Donald Trump has made nativism a pillar of his campaign, describing Mexican immigrants as rapists and two Boston men who beat a homeless immigrant as “passionate” fans.

The events described in the Times’ article took place 22 years before Donald Trump was even born, and he’s not responsible for any youthful sins his father may have committed. But given the racially-charged tone of the younger Trump’s campaign, it raises questions about the values he was taught by the man whose fortune he inherited.

Archive link (requires subscription) [New York Times]

Rob Beschizza contributed to this report