April 16, 2015 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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Scottish Inquiry to Probe Historic CIA Mind Control Experiments Involving Thousands of Victims

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

Holyrood inquiry to probe historic CIA-backed human brainwashing experiments

THE Holyrood inquiry into historic child abuse will be asked to investigate Scottish links to an infamous CIA-backed brainwashing programme, the Sunday Express can now reveal.

Apr 5, 2015

Scots-born psychiatrist Donald Ewen Cameron became notorious for his role in the top-secret MK Ultra programme, running experiments in orphanages and psychiatric hospitals in Canada in the 1950s.

He used LSD, electro-convulsive therapy (ECT), insulin-induced comas and repetition to try and erase memories – a technique the CIA hoped to develop into a weapon in the Cold War.

When details of the MK Ultra project emerged in the 1970s, it caused a huge public outcry and led to both the US and Canadian governments paying out compensation to hundreds of victims.

Now campaigners in Scotland are to come forward with sensational claims that similar experiments were also being carried out on this side of the Atlantic.

Last night, one abuse survivor said: “The similarities are unbelievable, the drugs programme, the experimentation – we were also doing these things in the 1950s here in Scotland, allowing this deplorable behaviour by the medical elite.”

One medic likely to be named by the campaigners is Dr Angus MacNiven, who trained alongside Cameron at Gartnavel Royal Hospital in Glasgow and went on to become one of the most eminent figures in Scottish medicine.

However, this newspaper has seen evidence that at least one patient died while being experimented on under his care.

Cameron, who was born in Bridge of Allan, Stirlingshire, emigrated to America in the 1920s, but remained in contact with his former colleagues in Scotland throughout his career.

The NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde archives contain a file of correspondence between Cameron and MacNiven, who was Physician Superintendent at Gartnavel from 1932 to 1966.

The correspondence covers the years 1924 to 1959 but it has been closed to the public for 75 years, along with the rest of MacNiven’s staff papers.

In July 1959, Cameron told a medical conference in Glasgow about his research into how “exposure to repetition of carefully worded statements” could change the personality.

This was the “brainwashing” or “psychic driving” procedure at the heart of MK Ultra, which has since been described as a form of “medical torture”.

The topic has featured in books and movies such as The Manchurian Candidate and The Men Who Stare At Goats.0academic Alfred William McCoy wrote: “Stripped of its bizarre excesses, Cameron’s experiments… laid the scientific foundation for the CIA’s two-stage psychological torture method.”

The survivor – who asked not to be named for legal reasons – said of MacNiven who died in 1982:  “The man was out of control and out of his depth and what he was doing in that hospital was absolutely appalling.”

It is known that experiments involving LSD were carried out at Gartnavel. Drug-induced comas, ECT, and “restraint and seclusion” were also commonplace in many asylums.

However, the suggestion that children were being used as guinea pigs in a programme linked to the British or American secret services is certain to prove hugely controversial if discussed at the inquiry.

These experiments were kept hidden from the public eye and they were happening in places all over Scotland

Frank Docherty

The claims were revealed by this newspaper in December and now form part of the official submission to the Scottish Government from the In Care Abuse Survivors (Incas) group.It states: “The Inquiry should also review medical experimentation that was carried out on vulnerable children, and adults without consent.”Alan Draper, the Incas Parliamentary Liaison Officer, said: “I’ve heard that name [Dr MacNiven] mentioned on a number of occasions.”I know that the legal people involved do have the relevant files, although the files do have a tendency to disappear.”One of the problems we want the inquiry to consider is the destruction of records.”

For example, many medical files from Lennox Castle Hospital in Lennoxtown, Stirlingshire, where some of the experiments are said to have taken place, were destroyed in a fire.

641880309_2028946However, the British Journal of Psychiatry archives do contain evidence of patients being “selected” for experiments at Gartnavel.

In 1936, MacNiven published a report of an experiment where 40 asylum patients – some of them suffering from “melancholia”, or depression -– were kept in a drug-induced state of sleep for 10 to 14 days.

One woman developed pneumonia and died, although in his report MacNiven denies it was linked to the injections of somnifaine – a powerful barbiturate.

He also reports that a man suffered a “cardiac collapse”.

One man’s temperature hit 104C, prompting MacNiven to note: “We felt it unwise to continue treatment in this case.”

MacNiven also gave permission for two drug trials involving schizophrenics, which set out to “deliberately provoke neurological disturbances”.

Both studies, in 1963 and 1964, resulted in “disturbing” side-effects.

No ages for patients are given but another Gartnavel study sanctioned by MacNiven in 1966 involved two 17-year-old “schoolboys”.

Incas president Frank Docherty, from East Kilbride, who first exposed the issue of abuse in Scottish children’s homes more than 15 years ago, said: “These experiments were kept hidden from the public eye and they were happening in places all over Scotland.

“The number of victims could run into thousands.”

The Scottish Consortium for Learning Disability has estimated that up to 12,000 children with learning disabilities spent time in residential care up to 1981.

Although it is not suggested that all were subjected to medical experimentation, the campaigners insist that a significant number would have experienced unwanted drug testing.

The Scottish Government said yesterday the inquiry’s chair and remit would be announced “by the end of April”.

A spokeswoman for the health board added: “It would be inappropriate for us to comment on allegations that happened many years ago.”

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/568485/Holyrood-inquiry-probe-historic-CIA-human-brainwashing-experiments

Also see: WikiLeaks publishes huge archive of hacked Sony documents: “Sony Pictures Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton is on the board of trustees of RAND Corporation, an organisation specialising in research and development for the United States military and intelligence sector. The Sony Archives show the flow of contacts and information between these two major US industries, whether it is RAND wanting to invite George Clooney and Kevin Spacey to events, or Lynton offering contact to Valerie Jarrett (a close advisor to Obama) or RAND desiring a partnership with IMAX for digital archiving. With this close tie to the military-industrial complex it is no surprise that Sony reached out to RAND for advice regarding its North Korea film The Interview. RAND provided an analyst specialised in North Korea and suggested Sony reach out to the State Department and the NSA regarding North Korea’s complaints about the upcoming film. The Sony documents also show Sony being in possession of a brochure for an NSA-evaluated online cloud security set-up called INTEGRITY.”

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WikiLeaks on Thursday published a searchable database of more than 30,000 documents and 173,000 emails leaked from the Sony Pictures Entertainment breach last year.

WikiLeaks, which publishes leaked, secret and classified information, posted the files in an easily searchable format.

It said they were important to keep in the public eye because of Sony’s ties to the White House, its extensive lobbying efforts on behalf of copyright law as well as its “connections to the US military-industrial complex,” the group said in a release on its site.

In a statement, Sony said it “vehemently disagrees” with the assertion that the material belongs in the public domain.

“The cyber-attack on Sony Pictures was a malicious criminal act, and we strongly condemn the indexing of stolen employee and other private and privileged information on WikiLeaks. The attackers used the dissemination of stolen information to try to harm SPE and its employees, and now WikiLeaks regrettably is assisting them in that effort,” the statement read.

The Culver City, Calif.-based company’s website was crippled beginningThanksgiving day of 2014 by hackers who also stole files and emails.

The attack was later linked to North Korea in revenge for Sony’s planned release of the Seth Rogen and James Franco movie, The Interview, which made fun of the secretive nation and ended with the assassination of its leader, Kim Jong Un.

The documents and emails give an easily-accessible picture of what’s normally hidden at a large multinational corporation.

They include connections between Sony and the Democratic Party, an email asking executives to donate to a $50,000 for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo for his anti-piracy work and links to the RAND Corporation, which WikiLeaks calls a part of “the military-industrial complex.”

There’s also a great deal of information about the movie world, including emails about Sony’s films as well as movies and TV shows produced by rivals.

Assange himself is under house arrest inside Ecuador’s embassy in London for the past two years. He has been accused of rape in Sweden, where prosecutors have been seeking is extradition.

The legal issues surrounding the postings are somewhat cloudy, said Kevin Smith, who directs the Office of Copyright and Scholarly Communication at Duke University in Durham, N.C.

The original files and emails would have been copyrighted by whoever created them, as “copyright is automatic, it literally follows the pen,” he said.

Posting the files without permission would be infringement upon that copyright.

Stolen, the word Sony uses, would mean the files and emails were taken and no longer accessible to the entity that originally owned them. That’s usually not the case with online material because the original files or emails remain intact, they’ve simply been copied.

However in the original hack attack on Sony, many of the company’s computer servers were damaged, meaning the original files actually were destroyed.

But what that means for WikiLeaks as the secondary publisher of them after the hackers first posted them is unclear.

“We just don’t have a word for this,” said Smith.

Also see: DEA Spy Program More Intrusive Than NSA Invasion

Indiscriminate spying was the DEA’s blunt force weapon of choice in its “War on Drugs.” The Drug Enforcement Agency and the Justice Department tracked billions of Americans’ phone calls, even people not suspected of crimes, for decades—and it looks like collateral damage wasn’t much of a concern.

New details from a USA Today investigation made it very clear that the scope of the DEA’s surveillance program, which it admitted to in January, was huge. Catch up with a friend in Montreal between the 1992 and 2013? Call home from a trip to Rome? There’s a good chance the government was keeping track.

For more than two decades, the Justice Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration amassed logs of virtually all telephone calls from the USA to as many as 116 countries linked to drug trafficking, current and former officials involved with the operation said. The targeted countries changed over time but included Canada, Mexico and most of Central and South America.

Surveillance wasn’t limited to people suspected of, you know, drug trafficking or even associating with people in the drug trafficking community or even smoking the occasional doob. Instead, the DEA scooped up almost everyone’s international calls on its sketchy country list, just in case. So basically, anyone who had foreign friends or liked to use their passport to travel was now suspect enough for government surveillance.

The DEA did not record the content of the calls, but kept meticulous records and queried the database on a daily basis to root up potential drug connections, looking at the logs and where people where when they made calls.

The DEA used its data collection extensively and in ways that the NSA is now prohibited from doing. Agents gathered the records without court approval, searched them more often in a day than the spy agency does in a year and automatically linked the numbers the agency gathered to large electronic collections of investigative reports, domestic call records accumulated by its agents and intelligence data from overseas.

In most cases, it appears the foreign governments were OK with the dragnet. Obviously, so were George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama, since the program continued over the course of their presidencies. And phone companies’ cooperation was integral to the plan:

The DEA did not have a real-time connection to phone companies’ data; instead, the companies regularly provided copies of their call logs, first on computer disks and later over a private network. Agents who used the system said the numbers they saw were seldom more than a few days old.

Again, this went on for decades. Decades! It only stopped in September 2013, after Edward Snowden went public with his knowledge of the NSA’s similar surveillance program. The DEA program is a clear precursor to the NSA program.

As news of the details of this intrusive program gets out, it’s already facing backlash. Human Rights Watch is filing a lawsuit to stop all continuing DEA bulk data collection.

Oh, and the reason this program got shut down? Well, it was getting less useful as the drug community started using the internet to talk, which is why the DEA hates how hard it is to spy on iMessages.

But it mostly got shut down to make the government look like its employees weren’t lying through their bureaucratic teeth. Government officials realized they would be flagrantly lying saying they only conducted bulk surveillance to stop terrorists, not to nab weed suppliers.

Officials said the Justice Department told the DEA that it had determined it could not continue both surveillance programs, particularly because part of its justification for sweeping NSA surveillance was that it served national security interests, not ordinary policing.

The mere existence of this DEA program quadruple underlines, in flaming red permanent marker, that the government’s surveillance programs are, as a matter of historical record, notsolely guided by national security interests.

[USA Today]