February 2, 2014 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

Gothic Condiment: The Bizarre, Blood-Soaked Family History Behind the Heinz Ketchup Fortune

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Excerpt from “Michele Bachmann’s biggest donors,” CityPages Blogs:

Clifford Heinz

Newport Beach, CA
Retired 

​An heir to the H.J. Heinz ketchup fortune, Heinz is on the conservative branch of the Heinz family tree. The liberal side produced Teresa Heinz Kerry, the filthy rich wife of Sen. John Kerry. That’s got to be hard for Clifford, who once bankrolled a failed Senate campaign for Lt. Col. Oliver North, the right-wing fall guy for Iran-Contra.

Famously reclusive, Clifford Heinz prefers to let his money do the talking. But a 2004 Los Angeles Times profile revealed one gem: When the Dalai Lama got the phone call telling him he’d won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989, he was staying at Clifford Heinz’s house. If anyone’s trying to make a backdoor money connection between Michele Bachmann and the Dalai Lama, there it is.

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667587bf732b8505290f6a706700fccdIn this Feb. 6, 2013 file photo, Secretary of State John Kerry whispers to his wife Teresa Heinz Kerry during the ceremonial swearing-in for him as the secretary of state, at the State Department in Washington. Kerry’s family financial portfolio could grow by hundreds of thousands of dollars as a result of the $23 billion mega-deal between Nebraska billionaire Warren Buffett and a Brazil-owned investment firm to buy out ketchup and food producer H.J. Heinz Co. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File) — Boston Globe, February 14, 2013

Family Has Seen Share of Turmoil

Along with power and wealth, the clan Teresa Heinz Kerry first married into has lived through tragedy and estrangement.

Ralph Vartabedian
Los Angeles Times, October 27, 2004

A Conservative Side

If Sen. John Heinz represented the family’s moderate politics and public policy, Clifford Heinz represents a different outlook.

A grandson of H.J. Heinz, Clifford has long — and quietly — underwritten conservative causes from his base in Orange County. He has acquired a wealth, celebrity and power separate and apart from the Pennsylvania wing of the family….

Heinz has helped fund the Free Congress Foundation, a Washington-based think tank, and has underwritten the campaigns of various Republicans, including Rep. Dana Rohrabacher of Huntington Beach. He has long funded ethics programs and endowed a chair for peace studies at UC Irvine.

“Clifford is a very principled, conservative Republican,” Rohrabacher said.

Clifford Heinz, 85, declined to be interviewed. His attorney, Bernard I. Segal, said his client had no desire to be drawn into a public controversy with Heinz Kerry. To put it mildly, the two have little in common politically.

Clifford Heinz was a key financial supporter of Oliver North, contributing $25,000 to his unsuccessful Senate campaign in 1994 — the same year Teresa Heinz sharply attacked the former U.S. Marine colonel and his role in the Iran-Contra matter in a speech before the National Assn. of Christians and Jews.

“It is difficult to imagine anything more cynical than Oliver North running for Congress,” she said in her speech. “This is a man who used his moment in the public eye to spit not just on politicians, but on the institution of Congress itself.”

Geographic Schism

Not long after the death of patriarch H.J. Heinz in 1919, his descendants began migrating to California, and a Western branch of the family came to outnumber the Eastern branch. By the Depression, a full-blown schism had occurred, centered around who would get the family wealth held by the senior Clifford Heinz.

A director and vice president for labor relations, Clifford had always been second fiddle to his older brother, Howard. And by the Depression, Howard’s son Jack was playing an influential role in the family business.

The battle began in March 1935, when the senior Clifford Heinz died of pneumonia at a Palm Springs hotel. He had left Pittsburgh three months earlier, hoping the dry desert air could cure him. Clifford’s third wife, Vira Ingham, was by his side when he died.

But the three children from his second marriage — Clifford, Nancy and Dorothy — were never informed of their father’s illness, even though they lived only a few hours away in Beverly Hills. Their mother was socialite Sara Moliere Young, who had run afoul of the Pittsburgh family.

After their father’s death, the teenage children received a second jolt, discovering that in Clifford’s final will, they had been disinherited. They came to believe that decision was made on his deathbed under pressure from the elders of the Pittsburgh clan.

“They tried to cut us out of the will,” recalled Nancy Heinz Russell. “Dad was not a strong, forceful man … and the Heinz family hated my mother. The Eastern family hated the Western family.”

The resulting lawsuit dragged on for decades, ultimately resulting in the children getting a large share of key Heinz trust funds.

It wasn’t the only time the family played tough when it came to money.

Rust Heinz, grandson to the company founder, moved to Pasadena in the 1930s and married Helen Clay Goodloe, daughter of a prominent family from Kentucky that included a U.S. senator and an ambassador.

When Rust was killed in a 1939 car accident, Heinz family attorneys persuaded his wife to take $25,000 and forfeit any claim to the family money. The couple had separated, but they were still legally married.

The inside story of what had happened was detailed in a newspaper article 16 years later in the Pittsburgh Press. The headline: “Heinz widow traded fortune for $25,000.”

After a second unhappy marriage, Helen Heinz took her life, according to her daughter, Margot Pierrong, a convention planner who lives in Anaheim.

“She was so young,” Pierrong said. “I am not bitter, but what the Heinz family did to my mother will come around.”

Out of Public View

Irene Heinz, the eldest child of the company founder, married and moved to Manhattan, and her branch of the family virtually disappeared from public view.

Irene’s husband, John LaPorte Given, suffered a nervous breakdown — under the harsh treatment of the Heinz family, according to his granddaughter. He retired early to play golf, and gave away tens of millions of dollars to Harvard University and other schools.

A daughter, Sarah Given, came to distrust the family money, saying it destroyed personal character. She married twice, the second time to a firefighter.

Sarah’s younger brother, John Given, became estranged from the family and was known for eccentric behavior. New York City police arrested him in 1948 on allegations that he beat a man with his cane.

When police examined the cane, they found a 28-inch dagger in its shaft. Four years later, after he fired a pistol at a neighbor’s birthday party, he was ordered by a New Jersey magistrate to leave town.

Given, who never married and suffered from alcoholism, died in 1957. In his will, he instructed executors at Chase Manhattan Bank to find deserving beneficiaries for his estate.

They gave more than $4.5 million to charity.

http://articles.latimes.com/2004/oct/27/nation/na-teresa27/3

 

The Rev Oscar Albeiro Ortiz was convicted in absentia last year for organising ruthless militia made up of former paramilitaries

January 31, 2014

Colombian officials have announced the capture of a fugitive Catholic priest who was convicted in absentia last year of organising a killer far-right militia made up of members of a dismantled paramilitary bloc.

For nearly a decade from 2003, the Rev Oscar Albeiro Ortiz formed and ran an organisation engaged in murder, extortion and forced displacement, according to his sentencing document.

From his pulpit in San Antonio de Prado, a village near Medellín, Ortiz had accompanied members of the paramilitary bloc, then recruited them after the bloc was ostensibly disbanded under a peace pact brokered by the government of then-president Alvaro Uribe. Critics of that “peace process” point to cases such as that of Ortiz as evidence that it was a sham.

Ortiz was arrested in 2010 but cleared by a lower court and continued to maintain that he was innocent. But he was later retried and convicted last August of criminal conspiracy and sentenced to 19 years in prison. He was rearrested on Thursday night in the town of La Virginia in Risaralda state.

His sentence, a copy of which the Associated Press obtained, says investigators using wiretaps had overheard Ortiz fingering as leftist rebels people who later turned up murdered. The sentence said that people beaten or driven from their homes by paramilitary henchmen of Ortiz were told they were being punished “for disobeying the orders of the priest”.

One witness quoted in the sentence described Ortiz “as a person of two faces: the good angel and the bad angel” and described seeing him late at night drinking with death squad members.

When Ortiz announced to his faithful at church one Sunday that some people would be coming to protect them, the witness said, he was referring to the arrival of paramilitaries who formerly belonged to the Cacique Nutibara bloc, which had killed hundreds of people.

The so-called paramilitaries, organised under the umbrella of the United Self-Defence Forces of Colombia, or AUC, committed more than 70% of the killings in the country’s nearly half-century-old dirty war, according to prosecutors. The AUC “demobilised” between 2003 and 2005, its leaders surrendering in exchange for reduced sentences of up to eight years in prison if they confessed to their crimes.

Their foes in the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia are now engaged in peace talks with the government in Cuba.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/01/priest-right-wing-death-squad-colombia-arrested

February 1, 2014

Download audio file

At the beginning of the US war on terror, and even to this day, the US literally kidnapped “suspects” and took them to countries where the could torture and even kill suspects. This practice of kidnapping and usually flying suspects around the world and then torturing or killing them in countries with poor human rights records or brutal regimes happened so much that the practice soon became known to all and the name for it “extraordinary rendition” became a household word.

The Voice of Russia’s John Robles spoke to Craig Murray, the former UK ambassador to Uzbekistan, and he stated that during his time as ambassador over 126 people were renditioned to Uzbekistan and never heard from again. He personally learned the name of the airline the CIA was using from CIA pilots. That airline was called Premier Executives.

AMB Craig Murray

Hello this is John Robles, I’m speaking with Mr. Craig Murray, he is a former UK Ambassador to Uzbekistan, an author and a former whistle blower. This is part 3 of an interview in progress.

PART 1     PART 2

Murray: The most prestigious BBC current affairs program really is Question Time, where a studio audience get to ask political questions of guests. I was invited to take part in that and the episode I was invited to take part, it was being recorded in Leeds. Now I was actually on the train to Leeds, on my way to take part in the program, when they phoned up and cancelled it.

This wasn’t the first time, and yet some of my views in this interview, they are not startling or unusual, and when it comes to opposing the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan and one can say the civil liberties – those are views which are held by the majority of citizens of the United Kingdom, but they are not views you will hear on television very often.

During the war in Iraq although there were at all times, around two weeks immediately after the invasion and of course it just surged, a deep surge of patriotism. And opinion polls at all times, the majority of people were against the war in Iraq, and yet the BBC, the people interviewed by the BBC, or talking about the war on the BBC, reject war by a majority of 13 to 1. And which … and that remains fairly constant throughout the war. The only thing, it’s quite extraordinary, we consider in the UK that we have liberty and freedom of speech, but we don’t; it’s very cynical, and these things are done quite subtly.

And the truth is that anyone who has genuinely radical views would never be given that kind of media exposure. I just give the BBC as a single example. But the entire media game in effect works much the same way. After Glenn Greenwald, you know that problem with the Guardian about the Snowden revelations where the Guardian, which is supposed to be a left-wing newspaper in the UK, only published certain revelations with both Snowden and WikiLeaks.

The Guardian heavily censored what was published, didn’t publish the vast majority of it, and the Guardian actually handed over lots and lots of classified material back to the UK security services. We have the gate-keeper system out there, which will prevent any genuinely radical politician being able to get over his views to the public in order to succeed.

Robles: If I can comment on that, I had an interview with Jeselyn Raddack, she was a US Department of Justice legal ethics advisor. And I talked to her about the revelations – now she is an advisor for Snowden – and she told me matter-of-factly and I was quite taken aback actually, she said that: ‘You know, all the journalists’, she said ‘there is no danger of injury or damage to National Security because all of the journalists run this stuff by the government first’. And I thought, she said it like it was a normal procedure – I guess it is in the US. My jaw just dropped, I was like ‘what the… what’s going on here? And yeah, so there you go. She said the Guardian does the same thing, she said anyone … it’s all vetted first. So, I mean, so basically these are revelations they want people to know about, because if there is anything damaging they tell the journalists – ‘well that’s a danger to national security’, and the journalists cut it out. Which, I found that shocking.

Murray: I am absolutely sure that it is true, but it is also interesting that journalists, and certainly in the UK. All the best media repeated the mantra again and again with regard to Bradley Manning’s revelations, and making of these revelations have put life at risk to people, this was Hillary Clinton’s great claim.

Robles: The woman responsible for so much death and destruction that her hands were almost bloodier than Bush’s, and she is going to talk about protecting lives, OK. I wonder if our Ambassador Stevens would have liked to have heard that from her. But anyway, I’m sorry, go ahead Sir.

Murray: No, well you’re quite right, because of course what Manning things revealing: illegal war, war crimes, killing of people, and despite the fact that all mainstream journalists again and again parrot it, and when people were interviewed on the subject of these revelations, journalists ask … I saw Glen Greenwald being very aggressively asked on BBC Hard Talk: was he not putting lives at risk, was he not putting lives at risk.

But the mainstream media have not been able to name one single person, not one single person who was killed as a result of Manning’s and Snowden’s revelations. And yet, there are undoubtedly millions of people being killed as the result of the illegal wars and war crimes that whistle-blowing has been revealing. …

Interview Continues

http://voiceofrussia.com/2014_02_01/CIA-front-exposed-by-UK-Ambassador-interview-with-Craig-Murray-0990/

“… The settlement, reached in February 2012 to resolve dozens of suits over Monsanto’s disposal of dioxin waste at a now-defunct facility in Nitro, W.Va., includes a $21 million fund that will pay for the medical testing of eligible Nitro community class members, which include thousands of people who lived, worked or attended school in the Nitro area during the period covered by the suit. …”

Law360, New York (January 27, 2014, 5:37 PM ET) — Objectors to Monsanto Co.’s $93 million deal with West Virginia residents alleging medical harm and property damage from Agent Orange herbicide produced at a nearby plant have turned to the U.S. Supreme Court after the state high court rejected their intraclass conflict claims. 

Three courts, including the West Virginia Supreme Court, have already declined to question the scope of the deal’s benefit allocations, which involve threshold levels of exposure that the objectors claim will leave 75,000 out of 80,000 class members uncompensated for medical monitoring, while only 40 percent will qualify for property damage payments.In upholding the settlement in November, the state high court rejected claims that the settlement created separate subclasses of those who will benefit and those who will not, saying the fact that some class members stood to receive nothing did not indicate a fundamental intraclass conflict.”Class membership entitles just that — membership — but not necessarily benefits,” the high court said.

But the decision contradicted instructions from the Supreme Court in its 1997 Anchem Products Inc. v. Windsor decision and elsewhere that subgroups with adverse interests cannot be bound by common counsel to an unfavorable settlement, according to the objectors’ Jan. 21 petition for writ of certiorari.

“The West Virginia Supreme Court failed to recognize that two subclasses were created when the settlement was negotiated that give certain class members benefits while denying any benefits to other class members and that there was a conflict between the representation of these two subclasses,” the petition said.

The settlement, reached in February 2012 to resolve dozens of suits over Monsanto’s disposal of dioxin waste at a now-defunct facility in Nitro, W.Va., includes a $21 million fund that will pay for the medical testing of eligible Nitro community class members, which include thousands of people who lived, worked or attended school in the Nitro area during the period covered by the suit.

On top of that fund, up to $63 million in additional funding will be available over the course of the 30-year medical-monitoring program, while a separate, $9 million fund will be put toward professional cleaning of about 4,500 eligible homes out of 12,000 in total within a five-mile radius of the plant, court records show. Monsanto also agreed to make a separate $29.5 million payment in attorneys’ fees and costs.

The lower courts all found the settlement permissible because all claimants were subjected to the same qualifying criteria for receiving payments. In their petition, the five petitioners led by Virdie Allen argued that the settlement was only evaluated for fairness, while their arguments regarding intraclass conflicts were given short shrift.

The conflict was triggered when it became clear that a “distinct subclass” of both the medical and property classes would receive no benefits “based on an arbitrary line” drawn between class counsel and Monsanto, the petition said.

“By representing both subclasses, class counsel and the class representatives in the present case were able to trade off the rights of the group that would receive no benefit to promote the interests of those who will receive a benefit under the settlement,” the petition said.

The petition also took issue with the trial court’s decision to recertify the property class for settlement purposes after having decertified it due to concerns over expert witness methodology, saying that under class certification guidelines the adequacy of the settlement class, including its representation, required a fresh take once the deal was struck.

“A new class certification analysis was required for the property remediation class in order to assure that the two subclasses ‘each independently satisf[ied] all prerequisites of Rules 23(a) and (b),’” the petition said.

A parallel lawsuit has been proceeding since 2009 in New York federal court and in 2011 survived a partial summary judgment bid based on Monsanto’s attempt to dodge liability under its status as a government contractor. Court records filed in early January indicate that the case has settled but that any deal is contingent on final approval of the West Virginia case.

The petitioners are represented by Thomas F. Urban II of the Law Firm of Urban & Falk PLLC.

The case is Virdie Allen et al. v. Monsanto Co. et al., case number 13-887, in the U.S. Supreme Court.

–Additional reporting by Sean McLernon and Maria Chutchian. Editing by Elizabeth Bowen.