March 16, 2015 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

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The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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GOP Plans to Slash Medicare, Medicaid & Food Stamps, Weighs Increase in War Funds to Exceed Pentagon Limits

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.


WASHINGTON (CBS) — Republicans now in charge of Congress offer their budget blueprint this week with the pledge to balance the nation’s budget within a decade and rein in major programs such as food stamps and Medicare.

More pressing for many Republicans, however, is easing automatic budget cuts set to slam the military.

The chairmen of the House and Senate Budget panels plan to release their budget plans this week – the House on Tuesday and the Senate on Wednesday. The nonbinding measure called a budget resolution sets broad parameters on taxes and spending; it requires follow-up legislation later this year to implement its balanced-budget goals, and Republicans are unlikely to take on that task as long as President Barack Obama occupies the Oval Office.

House Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price, R-Ga., and Senate Budget Committee Chairman Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., plan to produce blueprints that would balance the budget within 10 years – without raising taxes.

Instead, they will propose major spending cuts to programs such as Medicare, health care subsidies, food stamps and the Medicaid program for the poor and elderly to produce a budget that’s balanced. Such cuts, if actually implemented later, would likely slash spending by $5 trillion or so over the coming decade from budgets that are presently on track to spend almost $50 trillion over that timeframe.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/gop-cuts-medicare-food-stamps-in-new-budget-blueprint/

Elderly, disabled among those hit hardest by cut in food stamp benefits

By Robert Gebelhoff of the Journal Sentinel (Excerpt)

… “Case after case, we found people who were like, ‘What happened to my benefits?'” Tussler said. “Most people just got cut off, but they weren’t understanding why they were cut.”

Statewide participation in the FoodShare program dropped by 40,000 people over the past year after it peaked at around 860,000 in 2013. That translates to a 4.6% drop in participation, marking the first time Wisconsin saw a persistent decrease in the number of people taking part in FoodShare over the past 15 years.

The cuts have been implemented on a rolling basis since they were enacted. They follow a first round of reductions that came after federal stimulus funds expired late in 2013.

Tussler said the aid has been reduced so much that many recipients don’t even bother to cash in.

But disabled recipients on a fixed income, like 56-year-old Sherry Davis, have no choice but to make do with the $16 she’s given for food for the month.

“I was like, ‘Are you all being serious?'” Davis said. “I can’t buy food for $16.”

Davis said the cuts will probably mean she will have to give up most of her meat and will have to spend less on toilet paper and paper towels. It also means an increased reliance on food pantries.

The most recent data from Wisconsin’s Department of Health Services, from November, shows that households with an elderly or disabled resident are getting an average of $144 a month in benefits a month, but a quarter of the caseload is receiving $20 a month or less.

Since an initiative known as “Heat and Eat” ended in Wisconsin last year, the number of cases of elderly and disabled people receiving less than $20 in aid rose by about 7,000 — at twice the rate from the previous year.

A handful of Milwaukee legislators are looking to restore benefits with legislation reinstituting Heat and Eat.

Here’s how the program worked:

· The lower net income a person reports to FoodShare, the more benefits the person receives. In reporting income, people are able to deduct certain payments — like rent or mortgage, shelter costs and utility costs.

· To simplify income reporting, Wisconsin and 15 other cold-weather states offered a single deduction for heating and cooling costs. They also gave recipients the full deduction if they received any federal money through a heating assistance program called LIHEAP.

· To increase food benefits to people in Wisconsin, the state provided a $1 annual LIHEAP benefit to all FoodShare households. As a result, anybody in the FoodShare program received more food benefits.

Heat and Eat was the target of a number of conservative groups, like the Heritage Foundation, which decried it as a loophole contributing to an expansion of welfare and the national deficit.

In response, congressional Republican leaders like House Speaker John Boehner and Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan championed the attempt to end Heat and Eat programs.

They included a provision in the 2014 Farm Bill that said recipients could qualify for the utility deductions only with a LIHEAP payment of at least $20 annually. The Congressional Budget Office projected the change in policy would cut federal spending by $8.6 billion nationally over the next 10 years.

In Wisconsin, Heat and Eat added on average an extra $25 in food benefits. For elderly and disabled people in subsidized housing, who usually have their heat included in their rent, ending the program was a large loss in income deductions and in their resulting food aid.

Most states using Heat and Eat as a tactic responded by offering more LIHEAP money to recipients to preserve allowances to recipients. Wisconsin, New Jersey and Michigan were the only states not to do this.

The Hunger Task Force estimated that by pumping up LIHEAP money spent by taxpayers by $5.4 million to FoodShare recipients, the state would be able to preserve $276 million in benefits.

In the Wisconsin Legislature, Rep. David Bowen (D-Milwaukee) plans to introduce a bill to do just that in the second half of the year. This would be the second time Democratic legislators tried to restore the aid, but an effort led by Reps. Evan Goyke of Milwaukee and Katrina Shankland of Stevens Point failed to gain traction with Republicans last year.

Bowen said that Republican-controlled legislatures in Pennsylvania and Montana pulled together legislation to preserve their Heat and Eat programs.

Wisconsin could follow suit, but that would mean state Republicans going against their federal counterparts, who remain opposed to the practice. Ryan has criticized states for reinstating Heat and Eat and supported getting rid of Heat and Eat options altogether in the future.

State Republicans, including Kitty Rhoades, secretary for the state Department of Health Services, and state Rep. Mark Born of Beaver Dam, who heads the Public Benefits Reform Committee, declined to comment on the subject because Bowen’s legislation had not yet been introduced.

Gov. Scott Walker did not take a stance on the issue when legislation was previously introduced, but a spokesman for his office said at the time that it could not be done through executive order and only through legislative action.

GOP weighs increase in war funds to skirt Pentagon limits to ease fears of defense hawks

FILE – In this Jan. 13, 2015, file photo, Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., center, flanked by Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, and and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. Republicans now in charge in Congress offer their budget blueprint the week of March 16 with the pledge to balance the nation’s budget within a decade and rein in major programs such as food stamps and Medicare. More pressing for many Republicans, however, is easing automatic budget cuts set to slam the military. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are considering adding tens of billions of dollars to President Barack Obama’s request for overseas military operations in an effort to get around tight limits on Pentagon spending. The move comes as Republicans are set to unveil their latest budget plan.

Obama requested $51 billion for Pentagon operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, but GOP aides said Monday party leaders are weighing figures above $90 billion — enough to surpass Obama’s proposal to spend $38 billion above the limits for the budget year beginning in October.

GOP defense hawks have promised not to support any budget that doesn’t at least match Obama’s $561 billion request for defense, but a 2011 budget “sequestration” law imposes a $523 billion limit on the defense budget — an automatic cut of $54 billion below previously agreed levels.

War spending, however, is outside the limits and offers an easy way around the automatic cuts imposed after the failure of lawmakers to replace sequestration with alternative deficit-cutting moves.

The exact figure has yet to be determined and was still the subject of debate among top House Republicans on Monday.

But the move is likely to rile many conservatives who want to stick with the tight limits on spending.

House Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price, R-Ga., plans to reveal his 2016 budget blueprint Tuesday.

Price promises to balance the nation’s budget within a decade and rein in major programs such as food stamps and Medicare. He also promises to avoid tax increases.

Senate Armed Service Committee Chairman John McCain, R-Ariz., said Monday he’d like to swap a 10-year deficit-cutting plan to reverse two years’ worth of Pentagon cuts, which total more than $100 billion over 2016-17.

McCain opposes padding accounts for overseas military operations to ease cuts to the Pentagon’s core budget.

The chairmen of the House and Senate Budget panels plan to release their budget plans this week — the House on Tuesday and the Senate on Wednesday. The nonbinding measure called a budget resolution sets broad parameters on taxes and spending; it requires follow-up legislation later this year to implement its balanced-budget goals, and Republicans are unlikely to take on that task as long as President Barack Obama occupies the Oval Office.

Instead, they will propose major spending cuts to programs such as Medicare, health care subsidies, food stamps and the Medicaid program for the poor and elderly to produce a budget that’s balanced. Such cuts, if actually implemented later, would likely slash spending by $5 trillion or so over the coming decade from budgets that are presently on track to spend almost $50 trillion over that timeframe.

In the House, 70 Republicans have signed a letter by Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio, pledging their “unwavering support” for Obama’s $561 billion defense request instead of the $523 billion amount mandated under the 2011 budget deal. If they line up against Price’s budget plan as a bloc, it’ll be impossible to pass it.

A bipartisan Senate group, including Armed Services Committee members Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., and Tim Kaine, D-Va., hopes to develop a package of alternative cuts and, perhaps, new revenues to replace the forced cuts to the Pentagon and nondefense programs. They’re hoping to replicate a 2013 budget pact that partially eased the automatic cuts for the 2014-15 budget years.

Defense hawks have long eyed adding additional money to overseas contingency operations, or OCO, accounts that are not bound by the automatic cuts to provide relief to core Pentagon accounts like training, operations and maintenance.

“OCO is a potential source,” said House Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac Thornberry, R-Texas.

Jan. 4 2012

After a thorough beatdown in the Iowa caucuses last night, Newt Gingrich turned this morning to Miami, announcing a new gala fundraiser at the Biltmore that he hopes will re-energize his presidential campaign. Too bad Newt can’t ring up legendary Miami arms merchant Sarkis Soghanalian, who died in October.

Turns out Gingrich and Miami’s favorite “merchant of death” used to be so tight that the FBI launched a probe into whether Newt offered to help lift sanctions against Iraq (so Soghanalian could collect a weapons debt from Saddam) in exchange for cash.

The crazy but true story was recently dug out of the archives by New York Magazine, which republished a 1997 memo from Miami’s FBI office about Soghanalian’s allegations.Soghanalian built an arms empire from his Hibiscus Island mansion in the mid-’80s when the CIA hired him to supply Saddam Hussein with weapons during the Iran-Iraq War.With a Miami car dealer named Morty Bennett allegedly acting as a go-between with Marianne Gingrich, Newt’s now ex-wife, Soghanalian told the feds he’d worked a deal to pay the speaker of the house $10 million for his help in lifting the Iraq embargo.

Soghanalian had an outstanding $80 million debt from Saddam he wanted to collect.

The feds had the Miami dealer feeding them information about the deal for years and got the go-ahead to record a Miami Beach fundraiser scheduled with Gingrich in 1997 where Soghanalian was supposed to get the politico himself to talk about the deal.

But the FBI called off the recording for reasons that aren’t clear, and the case was dropped.

The Public Education Center recently spoke with Marianne Gingrich, who admitted she had met with Soghanalian in Paris, but she claims the two only talked about raising money for a firm she was working for, the Israel Export Development Corporation.

So here’s the real question today: Who wants to wiretap Gingrich’s fundraiser at the Biltmore next week to find out what kind of shady Miami characters he’s bilking cash from these days?

Read the FBI’s full memo below (which, we swear, was not culled from a James Ellroy novel):

gingrichprobe

It was such a frightful torrent of abuse that it made her physically ill – sick enough that she had to retire from her job as a math teacher at Huntington Middle School in San Marino.

“Filthy Jew – drop dead,” threatened one anonymous late-night phone call. “Jew, get out of San Marino,” read a message scrawled on her car window.

It could have been Germany in the 1930s—but instead it was San Marino in the 1980s. Georgia M. Gabor, a Jewish survivor of the Holocaust, whose parents had both perished in Nazi death camps, had endured roughly nine years of anti-Semitic terror from San Marino residents. Swastikas had been carved on her classroom door, assignments handed in with swastikas drawn on them, and anti-Jewish obscenities drawn on school lockers. Multiple threats greeted her by phone.

Gabor lived nearby in Sierra Madre and began teaching math at Huntington Middle School in 1969. She was, by all accounts, a much-loved teacher. Students would often listen with rapt attention to her gripping story of life as a teenager in Hungary during WWII, where she escaped the Nazis three times.

In 2014, a former student wrote, “I knew Georgia Gabor. She was my inspiration as a child, my math teacher in 7th grade. She was passionate and honest. She was my friend. Her story resonates with me. I recently visited the Jewish Quarter in Hungary, and she was always in my mind during the trip.”

Another former pupil, Leon D. Dame, once wrote to her: “Your class taught me a great deal more than mathematics. You taught me to have respect for all mankind […] In recounting your experiences as a young child, you were able to show me that prejudice and racism have no place in this world.”

The San Gabriel Valley Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution named Gabor “Outstanding Teacher of the Year” in 1987.

And yet, in 1981, when she published a harrowing memoir of her WWII years called My Destiny: Survivor of the Holocaust, she began receiving harassment in San Marino that was eerily similar to what she experienced during the war. “Every day I had to go to work and be reminded of what I lived through during the Holocaust,” she told the L.A. Times in 1992.

Until the mid-1960s, discriminatory real estate practices may have barred Jews (as well as blacks, Latinos, and Asians) from living in San Marino. The San Gabriel Country Club did not admit Jews until as late as 1975, and possibly into the 1980s.

In 2000, Uri Herscher, now 73, founder of the Skirball Cultural Center, recalled in an article for theWashington Post that San Marino was “truly a racist little community. It was packed with oil lords, and no Jews and no Italians lived there.”

Former Republican Congressman Pete McCloskey, who grew up in San Marino in the 1930s and ‘40s, similarly remembered that there were “no blacks in San Marino, and there were no Jews. They kept Jews out of San Marino by asking, ‘What’s the maiden name of your mother?’ The real estate people had a conspiracy. As with blacks, Jews in your neighborhood were supposed to make property values drop.”

A 1976 article from the L.A. Times notes that Jews only began to move in “about ten years” ago, and in 1971 the Western States Jewish Historical Quarterly remarked, “the Hillcrest Country Club [in Cheviot Hills] was started by two or three Jews who had belonged to the San Gabriel Country Club and had some sort of unpleasantness there.”

Gabor’s experience seemed to be a continuation of this long, unpleasant tradition. In 1992, when the L.A. Times exposed her mistreatment, Tom Brown, a consultant for the California Teacher’s Association, asserted: “definitely there is anti-Semitism in San Marino.”

So where did it come from?

The answer may lie in the founding fathers of the city. George S. Patton Jr., the celebrated WWII general and San Marino resident, was a closet anti-Semite, once calling Jews “lower than animals” and writing in his diary, “The Jewish type […] is, in the majority of cases, a sub-human species without any of the cultural or social refinements of our times.” His father, who served as San Marino mayor from 1913 until 1924, might have been equally prejudiced.

Tony Platt, a San Jose State University professor who did a fellowship at the Huntington Library in the early 2000s, found anti-Semitism rampant among the early trustees of the library, including Caltech’s Robert Millikan.

And then there was the anti-communist John Birch Society, who maintained its West Coast headquarters in San Marino from the early 1960s until 1989. The organization was, and still is, plagued with accusations of anti-Semitism by the Anti-Defamation League and Southern Poverty Law Center.

San Marino’s anti-Semitism kept pace with its unspoken policy of excluding minorities from the city. As late as 1970, according to the L.A. Times, there was only one black family in the city. One commenter on ILW.COM, an immigration law website, writes: “In the 1940s and 1950s, Asians were supposed to leave [San Marino] after dark, and only whites were allowed to buy homes there.”

Wambaugh

When policeman-turned-author Joseph Wambaugh moved to San Marino in 1975, he joined the San Gabriel Country Club—the elite links that serve San Marino, San Gabriel, and neighboring wealthy communities. When he asked a member if the club restricted Jews, the man replied nervously, “Are you only partJewish?” (Asked if the San Gabriel club had any Latinos, another golfer responded: “Well sure, we have some Mexicans—the caddies!”)

The San Marino City Club might have excluded Jews as well. In a 2013 recollection, Janice Lee-McMahon, the first female president of the club, explained, It was founded in 1926 and was an old, male, all-white club until 12 years ago.” All-white, in San Marino terminology, probably meant gentile.

Things did begin to change slowly when Asians started to settle in San Marino in the 1980s, adding to the diversity of the city, but this led to further tensions: in 1984, a 17-year-old Chinese-American youth was assaulted at Huntington Middle School in a racially-motivated attack by three white teenagers. Asian businesses were vandalized throughout the decade, and one angry resident even petitioned to have English made the official language of the city in 1986.

As late as 1988, a study conducted by the City of Sacramento concluded that the San Gabriel Country Club may have been one of several golf courses statewide that still excluded Jews and non-Caucasians. (Even today, the club faces occasional discrimination charges.)

When Georgia Gabor released her memoir in June 1981, she embarked on a national tour to promote it, with stops in Oklahoma and elsewhere. In the book, she recounted her experience as a teenager in Budapest, Hungary during WWII. After the Nazis overtook the city in 1944, she saw her entire family killed, and she herself escaped three times—once by climbing over a pile of dead bodies that were being devoured by rats. She also witnessed the torture and killing of scores of other Jews. Later, she escaped the Soviet army as it overtook Hungary following the war. Fleeing Europe in 1947, she was adopted by foster parents and eventually settled in Southern California, where she graduated from UCLA.

ABEbooks

Her story inspired countless readers and students, but some in San Marino saw it a different way. Even as San Marino’s John Birchers railed against the assault on American freedoms by a phantom communist army, unknown citizens peppered Gabor with death threats over the phone. On a routine visit to the post office, Gabor returned to her car to find the message “Jew, get out of San Marino” written in magic marker.

Then there were the swastikas. They greeted her everywhere: on school desks, lockers, homework assignments, and white supremacist flyers left anonymously on her table. Was it the work of students? If so, who were their parents?

When Gabor complained to the San Marino school board, a wall of opposition mounted against her. Some accused her of being “obsessed with the Holocaust.” One letter from a parent called her “sly and cunning,” and, in 1990, 36 parents petitioned to have her removed from the school, according to theL.A. Times.

Gabor, who appears in a video interview for the Bay Area Holocaust Oral History Project in 1983, looking bubbly and cheerful—younger than her 52 years—was evidently exhausted by 1990, when her doctor ordered her to go on medical leave from her teaching job. “The harassment had made her physically and emotionally ill,” reported the Times.

In October 1991, she sued the San Marino Unified School District, alleging discrimination and claiming they had offered her fewer benefits than she deserved when she applied for early retirement. Whether she ever received any benefits is unclear. According to her own account, she was forced to sign “an 11-page legal document that absolved the district of any future liability.” Tom Brown of the California Teacher’s Association said he “had never heard of a teacher being asked to sign such a statement.”

The result of the lawsuit remains uncertain, and the Social Security Death Index says that Gabor died in Sierra Madre in 1994—at the age of 64. One has to wonder if the years of intimidation she endured in San Marino contributed to her early death. (Author’s note: I searched for surviving relatives online, but wasn’t able to locate any.)

“It’s very important for me to convey that bigotry and discrimination are what causes man’s inhumanity to man,” Gabor once said in an interview. “It can start out by little things but it can mushroom quickly.”

Here’s to you, Ms. Gabor.

Watch a 1983 interview with Georgia Gabor on her Holocaust experiences here.

Additional Sources:

– “Asian Broker Says 8 Teens Didn’t Steal Chinese Sign,” Los Angeles Times, March 5, 1989

– “Birch Society Named as Being Anti-Semitic,” Los Angeles Times, February 2, 1966.

– “Golf With the Club Set Not a Game for Ex-Cop,” Los Angeles Times, January 19, 1975

– “A Long Lesson in Hate,” Los Angeles Times, April 23, 1992.

– “No Community a Racial Island, San Marino Told,” Los Angeles Times, March 4, 1970

– “San Marino: A Low-Keyed Elegance,” Los Angeles Times, February 1, 1976

– “San Marino Youth Vows to Take English Issue to Voters,” Los Angeles Times, March 16, 1986

– “Victim’s Book Vividly Recalls Jewish Holocaust in Hungary,” Los Angeles Times, September 27, 1981

Sponsors supporting the use of humans in clinical trials of medical products are faced with two mandates for disclosure: legal and ethical. It’s when neither of these obligations are being met that a question arises from the medical community: Why not?

A new report conducted by Duke Medicine found that sponsors of clinical trials for medical products are failing to publicly disclose results in a timely manner. The study’s findings will be made available in the March 12, 2015, issue of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) — a peer-reviewed medical journal published by the Massachusetts Medical Society.

“The human experimentation that is conducted in clinical trials creates ethical obligations to make research findings publicly available,” the authors of the study stated in the report.

The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) requires sponsors of applicable clinical trials (ACTs) to report findings to ClinicalTrials.gov  within one year of completion. According to the study, which looked at 13,327 highly likely applicable clinical trials (HLACTs) from 2008-2013, 13.4% of HLACTs reviewed reported results within 12 months of completion. Researchers used an algorithm based on input from the National Library of Medicine to spot HLACTs.

The report also took a look at trials funded by the medical product industry, academic or government institutions, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). According to what they found, reporting results vary based on who funds research. Industry-sponsored research fared the best, reporting 17% of trials within 12 months. The NIH disclosed 8.1% of its trials, and only 5.7% of trials funded by academic or government institutions were reported. At five years, reporting was similar for industry (41.5%) and NIH funded (38.9%) trials.

There’s a reason why the study’s researchers identified HLCATs instead of using ACTs. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for enforcing FDAAA, but Dr. Monique Anderson, the study’s lead author, in an interview told Forbes that enforcement “hasn’t occurred yet because the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking has only recently been released. This rule clarifies which trials are subject to FDAAA and expands the scope to include mandating reporting for unapproved products.”

Failing to publicly disclose the results of clinical trials can result in unwanted consequences for both research participants and researchers. “We have an ethical obligation to research participants of clinical trials to use their information to contribute to generalizable knowledge,” Anderson said. “It helps them promote trusted and confidence for research participants to know that their information will be publicly available.”

“For researchers, it is critically important to know the results of any trials involving investigational medical products, regardless of the outcome,” she said. “This helps to both foster innovation and reduce duplication of clinical trials, especially those involving medical products which led to harm or that had no benefit.”

Anderson expects results reporting to increase significantly after the final rule for FDAA is released. “The rule will clarify those trials that are mandated to report,” she said. “Also, certain trials of unapproved products will also be required to report results to the website.

“Additionally, the NIH has released its only draft policy which will mandate reporting for all NIH funded research to ClinicalTrials.gov,” Anderson stated. “Academic institutions will need to implement their own internal policies to ensure timely reporting.”