January 19, 2015 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

A Labyrinthine Plot in Argentina: Terrorism, Oil, Murder, Cover-Up & the Puzzling Death of a Prosecutor (NY Times)

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

“… It was only in the past week that Mr. Nisman, 51, leveled explosive accusations that top Argentine officials, including President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, had conspired with Iran to cover up responsibility for the bombing as part of a deal that would supply Iranian oil to Argentina. Now, the mystery has deepened with the discovery of Mr. Nisman’s body on Sunday. …”

Puzzling Death of a Prosecutor Grips Argentina

Just one day earlier, on Saturday, the prosecutor, Alberto Nisman, said, “I might get out of this dead.”

From the moment 10 years ago when he was assigned to investigate the 1994 suicide bombing of a Jewish center here that left 85 people dead, Mr. Nisman, an even-keeled lawyer, became entangled in a labyrinthine plot that he traced to Iran and its militant Lebanese ally, Hezbollah.

Mr. Nisman
Mr. Nisman

But it was only in the past week that Mr. Nisman, 51, leveled explosive accusations that top Argentine officials, including President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, had conspired with Iran to cover up responsibility for the bombing as part of a deal that would supply Iranian oil to Argentina. Now, the mystery has deepened with the discovery of Mr. Nisman’s body on Sunday — the day before he was to testify before lawmakers about those accusations.

The timing of his death, and the outrage and skepticism it provoked in Argentina and elsewhere, raised a torrent of new questions about an unresolved case that many here call a national disgrace.

The latest turn is convulsing Argentina’s political establishment over whether the country’s acutely politicized institutions can ever prosecute those responsible for the bombing, one of the deadliest anti-Semitic attacks since World War II.

“This has turned into an attack on the credibility of the fundamental institutions of the republic,” said Santiago Kovadloff, an essayist and columnist for the newspaper La Nación.

Officials in Mrs. Kirchner’s government were quick to assert that Mr. Nisman appeared to have killed himself. The security minister, Sergio Berni, said evidence at the scene, including a .22-caliber pistol and spent cartridge found near Mr. Nisman’s body, indicated suicide. Autopsy results announced later said he had died of a bullet wound to the head.

The bullet was almost definitely fired from the Bersa pistol that lay next to his body, according to an unidentified police official quoted by Télam, the state news agency. The government’s national firearms registry also said that Mr. Nisman had two guns registered in his name. It was unclear whether the Bersa was one of them.

Another line of investigation, Télam reported, was that the gun used may have been lent by a friend to Mr. Nisman.

Officials transporting the body of Alberto Nisman, a federal prosecutor, to a morgue in Buenos Aires on Monday. Credit Claudio Fanchi/Télam, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Officials transporting the body of Alberto Nisman, a federal prosecutor, to a morgue in Buenos Aires on Monday. Credit Claudio Fanchi/Télam, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

News of his death immediately prompted doubts and questions from the political opposition and leaders of Argentina’s Jewish community, Latin America’s largest with an estimated 250,000 people. “Everything is far more sordid than it appears,” said Elisa Carrió, an outspoken congresswoman. “They killed him or they induced his death.”

On Twitter, Rabbi Sergio Bergman, a congressman, called Mr. Nisman “victim 86 of the AMIA attack,” using the Argentine acronym for the Argentina Israelite Mutual Association, the destroyed Jewish community center.

Mr. Nisman, who had been selected to investigate the bombing by Néstor Kirchner, Argentina’s former president and Mrs. Kirchner’s late husband, had been expected at the hearing to explain the criminal complaint he filed last week against Mrs. Kirchner; her foreign minister, Héctor Timerman; and others.

On Sunday afternoon, the officers assigned to guard Mr. Nisman were concerned because they had been unable to contact him by telephone and his Sunday newspaper still lay outside his apartment. They called his family, but his mother was unable to open the apartment door with a spare key because a key was stuck in the lock on the other side. A locksmith was called, and Mr. Nisman’s mother entered the apartment with the officers.

The prosecutor investigating Mr. Nisman’s death, Viviana Fein, told reporters on Monday morning that there were no witnesses and no suicide note. She said she was awaiting evidence that included closed-circuit television footage and a list of phone calls. She also said that Mr. Nisman had not eaten dinner Sunday.

Ms. Fein emphasized that it remained unclear whether Mr. Nisman had killed himself. In comments broadcast on Argentine radio, she said that the gun found at his side may not have been his, and that investigators were reviewing his phone records and text messages to determine if he had been receiving threats.

“We cannot say that this case is solved,” Ms. Fein said.

After years of inquiry into the 1994 attack, marred by delays and corruption charges, Mr. Nisman seemed to bring vigor to the investigation after taking over in 2005. He accused Hezbollah of having carried out the bombing and senior Iranian officials of having planned and financed it, accusations that Hezbollah and Iran’s government have long denied.

The charges put a deep chill on relations between the two countries until 2013, when theyreached an agreement to investigate the attack.

The president did not comment on Mr. Nisman’s death. But Aníbal Fernández, a top official at the presidency, was quoted by Argentine news media as saying he believed Mr. Nisman had killed himself. Declaring that he was “stupefied,” Mr. Fernández also sought to assure that the investigation into the bombing would not be undermined if Mr. Nisman had filed his years of findings properly.

Mr. Nisman seemed to have dropped an oddly prophetic hint last Wednesday, telling a TV interviewer, “With Nisman around or not, the evidence is there.”

He disclosed last week that he had obtained intercepts of telephone calls between Argentine intelligence agents and Iranian officials in which details of the secret deal were discussed. He accused Mrs. Kirchner of directly ordering a covert team of negotiators to make an offer “from the shadows” to Iran. In return, Mr. Nisman said, Argentina guaranteed immunity to former Iranian government officials in an effort to obtain Iranian oil to ease Argentina’s energy shortage.

Pointing to delays that have long shrouded the investigation, and to the endemic pressuring of judges and prosecutors here, the political opposition demanded a transparent and speedy inquiry into his death.

“We’re used to things in Argentina remaining in the dark,” said Gabriela Michetti, an opposition politician.

Further fueling suspicions here is Argentina’s recent history of suspicious deaths officially described as suicides. In 1990, for example, the death of a former top customs official who had been investigating irregularities was presented as a suicide. An autopsy later showed that he had been struck in the face before the bullet that killed him was fired.

The political opposition and large Jewish community here have fiercely objected to the agreement with Iran, calling it a vehicle for immunity. The agreement was also ruled an unconstitutional overreach of the executive branch by a local court last year.

The Anti-Defamation League, the New York-based group that campaigns against anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry, said in a statement that Mr. Nisman’s death was “another tragic episode in the sordid saga of Argentina’s failure to act decisively and unceasingly to find, arrest and prosecute those responsible for the AMIA terror attack.”

A crowd of thousands gathered outside the presidential palace here Monday night to protest the mysterious circumstances shrouding Mr. Nisman’s death. They clapped in unison, and some held signs that read “Cristina murderer,” a reference to the president, or “I am Nisman.”

“They forced him to suicide, which is the same as murder,” said Cecilia Viñuela, 50, a publicist who was in the crowd. “I’m angry and sad because I know we will never know the truth.”

NBC NEWS, 10/24/2006 — “Murderer who Said He was a Prophet is Executed“: Ohio executed a religious cult leader Tuesday for the murder of a family of five followers who were taken one at a time to a barn, bound and shot to death. The youngest was a girl just 7 years old.

Jeffrey Lundgren, 56, died by injection at 10:26 a.m. at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility for the deaths of the Avery family.

“I profess my love for God, my family, for my children, for Kathy (his wife). I am because you are,” Lundgren said in his final statement.

The evidence against Lundgren was compelling.

Upset by what he thought was the Avery family’s lack of faith, arranged a dinner hosted by cult members. Afterward, he and his followers led the Averys one by one — the father first, young Karen last — to their deaths while the others unknowingly cleaned up after dinner. A chain saw was used to muffle the gunfire.

‘I can in fact talk to God’

Lundgren argued at his trial in 1990 that he was prophet of God and therefore not worthy of the death penalty.

“It’s not a figment of my imagination that I can in fact talk to God, that I can hear his voice,” he had told the jurors. “I am a prophet of God. I am even more than a prophet.” …

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/15398559/ns/us_news-crime_and_courts/t/murderer-who-said-he-was-prophet-executed/#.VL3CF0fF-So

Kirtland cult killings: Timeline of events

Following are major dates in the Kirtland cult killings

MORE: Kirtland cult killings: Stories, multimedia and more

April 19, 1984 — Jeffrey Lundgren, his wife, Alice, and four children move from Missouri to Kirtland.

April 1987 — Dennis Avery, who became a devoted follower of Jeffery Lundgren in Missouri, moves to Kirtland. Accompanying him are wife, Cheryl, and daughters Trina, 15, Rebecca, 13, and Karen, 7. They later occupy a rented house in Madison Township.

November 1987 — Jeffrey Lundgren, his family and some of Lundgren’s followers move into a rented farmhouse at 8671 Euclid-Chardon Road. It is at this residence that Lundgren formally organizes his followers into a paramilitary religious cult.

January 1988 — Jeffrey Lundgren dismissed as a lay minister and tour guide at the Kirtland Temple, Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Kirtland Stake President Dale Luffman says Lundgren was let go “for ethical and moral issues that are critically important to us.” Later, it is revealed Temple officials accused Lundgren of stealing $25,000 to $40,000 from Temple coffers.

February 1988 — Former cult member Kevin Currie, a friend of Jeffrey Lundgren from their days in the U.S. Navy, becomes disenchanted with Lundgren and his radicalized teachings. He leaves Kirtland and moves to Buffalo, N.Y. Currie visits the FBI field office in Buffalo and tells agents about Lundgren’s plan to use lethal force to seize the Kirtland Temple on May 3, 1988. The FBI passes along the information to Kirtland Police Chief Dennis Yarborough.

April 29, 1988 — Kirtland resident contacts the police and tells Patrolman Ron Andolsek that she suspects a cult is living at 8671 Euclid-Chardon Road. It’s also reported that Jeffrey Lundgren’s son, Caleb, had warned the neighbor’s children about demons emerging from the ground in May.

May 2, 1988 — Yarborough confronts Jeffrey Lundgren at the Kirtland Police station about the next day’s planned takeover of Kirtland Temple. Lundgren also is asked about reports of gunfire on the Euclid-Chardon Road property. Lundgren tells followers the Temple takeover won’t happen after his conversation with a higher power. Kirtland police begin steady surveillance of the Lundgren residence.

September 1988 — A second informant comes forward to Andolsek with tips about questionable, potentially deadly plans attributed to Jeffrey Lundgren. Andolsek shares the information with agents from the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and FBI.

April 16, 1989 — Using Dennis Avery’s credit card, Jeffrey Lundgren buys three guns from a Bainbridge Township gun store. Among the purchases is a .45 caliber Colt handgun.

April 17, 1989 — Dennis and Cheryl Avery withdraw their three daughters from Madison schools. Later that night, all five of the Averys are shot to death by Jeffrey Lundgren in the barn at 8671 Euclid-Chardon Road. Their bodies are buried in a pit in the barn, covered with lime, soil, rocks and garbage.

11aApril 18, 1989 — Kirtland police officers, assisted by FBI agents, arrive at 8671 Euclid Chardon Road to question Jeffrey Lundgren and all followers present. Authorities have no knowledge of the killings of the Averys. Instead, they search for weapons and ask followers if they are there of their own free will. Later that day, fearing that police would soon return to investigate the Avery killings, Lundgren and his followers hastily leave the home and begin the journey to a remote campsite in West Virginia.

Dec. 31, 1989 — Disenchanted cult member Larry Keith Johnson, whose wife Kathy left him to take up with Lundgren, contacts ATF agents in Kansas City, Missouri. Johnson tells them about the murders of the Averys. He gives agents a hand-drawn map of the barn and burial pit.

Jan. 3, 1990 — Acting on information provided by ATF agents in Kansas City, Yarborough, Andolsek and other members of Kirtland’s police and fire departments enter the barn at 8671 Euclid-Chardon Road to begin the search for the burial pit portrayed in Johnson’s drawing. After clearing away large mounds of garbage and debris, the digging begins. With darkness approaching, they find the first set of human remains. Yarborough contacts Lake County Prosecutor Steve LaTourette to report the finding. LaTourette generates search warrants for the property.

Jan. 4, 1990 — Careful excavation continues in the barn. Kirtland police are joined by deputies from the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, investigators from the Lake County Crime Lab, representatives of the prosecutor, FBI and ATF agents and other area law enforcement officers. The first body found, in a relatively advanced state of decomposition, is believed to be that of an adult male. Subsequently removed from the pit over the course of the day are the bodies of four females. The bodies are taken to the office of the Cuyahoga County Coroner for autopsies and identification.

Jan. 5, 1990 — LaTourette goes to the grand jury and secures multi-count felony indictments of Lundgren and 12 of his followers in connection with the deaths of the Averys. Arrest warrants are issued..Jan. 7, 1990 — Jeffery Lundgren, his wife, Alice, and son, Damon, are taken into custody by ATF agents at a motel between San Diego, California, and the Mexican border.

Jan. 10, 1990 — Cuyahoga County Coroner’s office confirms that the bodies found in the Kirtland barn are the Averys. Cult members Daniel D. Kraft and Kathryn Johnson are taken into custody in the Cleveland National Forest near San Diego.

March 7, 1990 — Cult member Richard E. Brand pleads guilty on five counts of aggravated murder as part of a plea deal. Sentenced to 15 years to life in prison, he is the first cult member convicted in connection with Avery murders.

April 10, 1990 — Municipal Court judge in San Diego orders cult leader Jeffrey Lundgren and followers Daniel D. Kraft and Kathryn Johnson extradited to Ohio.

April 13, 1990 — Lundgren, Daniel D. Kraft and Kathryn Johnson are processed into the Lake County Jail as the last of those charged in the Avery murders to be returned. Lake County Prosecutor’s Office drops charges against cult members Dennis and Tonya Patrick of conspiracy to commit aggravated murder, complicity to commit aggravated murder and kidnaping against. The reason given is non-involvement. The Patricks later are convicted on one count each of obstruction of justice. Their sentences are suspended.

April 25, 1990 — Cult member Gregory S. Winship pleads guilty on five counts of complicity to murder as part of a plea deal. Sentenced to 15 years to life in prison.

May 4, 1990 — Cult member Sharon J. Bluntschly pleads guilty on five counts of conspiracy to commit aggravated murder as part of a plea deal. Sentenced to seven to 25 years in prison.

May 9, 1990 — Cult member Deborah S. Olivarez pleads guilty on five counts of conspiracy to commit aggravated murder as part of a plea deal. Sentenced to seven to 25 years in prison.

May 18, 1990 — Lake County Prosecutor’s office drops all murder and kidnapping charges against cult member Kathryn Johnson for non-involvement. Later sentenced to one year in prison for obstruction of justice.

Aug. 1, 1990 — Alice Lundgren is convicted by a jury in Lake County Common Pleas Court of five counts each of conspiracy to commit aggravated murder, complicity to commit aggravated murder and kidnapping.

Aug. 3, 1990 — Cult member Susan Luff pleads on five counts of conspiracy to commit aggravated murder as part of a plea deal. Sentenced to seven to 25 years in prison.

Aug. 13, 1990 — Jeffrey Lundgren’s trial begins in Lake County Common Pleas Court.

Aug. 29, 1990 — Jeffrey Lundgren found guilty by a jury of five counts each of aggravated murder and kidnapping.Alice Lundgren is sentenced by Judge Paul H. Mitrovich to 150 years to life in prison.

Sept. 18, 1990 — Damon Lundgren is found guilty by a jury in Lake County Common Pleas Court of four counts each of aggravated murder and kidnapping.

Sept. 20, 1990 — The jury in the Jeffrey Lundgren trial deliberates for two hours before recommending Lundgren be sentenced to die in the electric chair.

Sept. 21, 1990 — Judge Martin O. Parks concurs with the jury’s recommendation and sentences Jeffrey Lundgren to death.

Sept. 26, 1990 — Jury in Damon Lundgren trial recommends life imprisonment on each of four counts of aggravated murder with parole eligibility of 120 years on each count.

Oct. 4, 1990 — Judge Paul Mitrovich sentences Damon Lundgren to four consecutive life terms, 120 years to life, with parole eligibility in 120 years.

Nov. 5, 1990 — Daniel D. Kraft pleads guilty on five counts of aggravated  murder and three counts of kidnapping. Sentenced to 50 years to life in prison.

Dec. 20, 1990 — Ronald B. Luff is found guilty by a jury in Lucas County Common Pleas Court on five counts each of aggravated murder and kidnapping. Sentenced to 170 years to life.

Aug. 23, 1991 — Kathryn R. Johnson released from prison at the expiration of her sentence.

Oct. 24, 2006 — With the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals having dismissed the last of his appeals, Jeffrey Lundgren is executed by lethal injection at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility.

March 29, 2010 — Richard E. Brand paroled after spending 19 years, 50 days in prison

Dec. 30, 2010 — Gregory Winship paroled after spending 19 years, 10 months in prison.

Jan. 4, 2011 — Sharon J. Bluntschly paroled after spending 19 years, 11 months in prison. Deborah S. Olivarez paroled after spending 19 years, six months in prison.

Jan. 11, 2011 — Susan Luff paroled after spending 19 years, 11 months in prison.

Still imprisoned are Daniel Kraft (parole eligibility, 2024), Ronald Luff (parole eligibility, 2048), Alice Lundgren (parole eligibility, 2092) and Damon Lundgren (parole eligibility, 2098).

MORE: Kirtland cult killings: Stories, multimedia and more

 January 17, 2015

Having worked for CNN for 34 years, veteran anchor Jim Clancy resigned suddenly from his position, following a heated Twitter debate which exposed him as an anti-Semite.

The Twitter row started around a week ago, when Clancy claimed that people who disagree with him regarding Mohammed cartoons are “agents for Israel.”

In Clancy’s official statement announcing his abrupt exit from CNN, he wrote the following statement.

“After nearly 34 years with Cable News Network, the time has come to say farewell! It has been my honor to work alongside all of you for all of these years. This is one of the greatest news organizations in the world. It has truly revolutionized information delivery while driving technological advances in how we gather the news.”

Regarding the pictures of Mohammed, Jim Clancy went ahead and tweeted, “The cartoons NEVER mocked the Prophet. They mocked how the COWARDS tried to distort his word. Pay attention.”

Following that statement, Oren Kessler of the Washington, D.C.-based Foundation for the Defense of Democracies got involved, tweeting that Clancy’s statement was totally untrue, due to the fact that Charlie Hebdo had been previously targeted for publishing an issue in which the prophet Mohammed was listed as a “guest editor.”

Clancy hit back by suggesting that Kessler was an Israeli propaganda agent, to which Kessler responded, “Huh? What on Earth are you talking about? I call you out on your unfamiliarity with the facts, and that’s your response? Extraordinary. You might want to actually look at the cartoons before tweeting about them. I have a collection.”

To that Clancy retorted, “This is great, a pro-Israel voice try [sic] to convince us that cartoonists were really anti-Muslim, and that’s why they were attacked. FALSE. These accounts are part of a campaign to do PR for Israel(including “Jews Making News”) but not HR (Human Rights.) Here’s the rub: Those organizations” have about 50 followers each.

Okay, Clancy we get the message, you don’t like Jews very much, we heard you loud and clear.

If that wasn’t enough, Clancy struck out again, this time at Twitter user @HumanRights2K, posting, “Thanks for the glimpse into your dreams. Everyone who stands for Human Rights is anti-Semitic. Great moniker, that.”

In the aftermath of the online exchange, Clancy blocked his critics and eventually took his account down entirely, just before announcing his retirement from CNN.

Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/1763924/veteran-cnn-anchor-jim-clancy-leaves-cnn-after-being-exposed-as-an-anti-semite/#qb0QHVSKQwzAePBr.99