December 10, 2014 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

Convicted CIA Torture Whistleblower Describes Prison Life In Remarkable Detail

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

John Kiriakou, the former CIA officer sentenced to two and a half years in prison for leaking the name of a secret agent in charge of the CIA’s Bush-era torture program, has written a letter detailing his initial time served at the Federal Correctional Institute in Loretto, Pennsylvania.

The letter reveals a very interesting perspective of a trained intelligence officer – Kiriakou worked for the CIA from 1990 to 2004 – co-mingling with a variety of common criminals.

Kiriakou, 47, who pleaded guilty in October and began his sentence in February, begins the letter by saying that his imprisonment is “punishment for blowing the whistle on the CIA’s illegal torture programand for telling the public that torture was official U.S. government policy.”

Here are some of the highlights from his picture of prison life:

  • My cellmates include two Dominicans serving 24- and 20-year sentences for drugs; a Mexican serving 15 years for drugs, and a Puerto Rican serving 7 1/2 years for drug conspiracy; and the former auditor of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, who’s doing a long sentence for corruption. They’re all decent guys and we actually enjoy each other’s company.
  • Of the white prisoners, most are pedophiles with personal stories that would make you sick to your stomach. The rest of the white prisoners are here for drugs, except for a dozen or so who ran Ponzi schemes.
  • Of the 1,369 prisoners, 40 have college degrees and six of us have master’s degrees. The GED program is robust.
  • I’m a janitor in the chapel. I make $5.25 a month.
  • It turned out that I had to get a copy of my formal sentencing documents to prove that I wasn’t a child molester. I did that, and was welcomed by the Aryans, who aren’t really Aryans, but more accurately self-important hillbillies.
  • [One female Corrections Officer] stopped me and said, “Are you the motherf—– whose name I can’t pronounce?” I responded, “Ki-ri-AH-koo.” She said, “how about if I just call you F—face?”

Check out the full letter >

Kiriakou goes on to explain why he gets along with each ethnic demographic in prison, saying: “So far, so good.”

He also claims that Corrections Officers tried to get him into a violent confrontation with a Muslim inmate by telling him he was the uncle of the Times Square bombers, adding: “Instead, we’re friendly, we exchange greetings in Arabic and English, and we chat.”

In a 2007 interview with ABC, Kiriakou confirmed for the first time that Abu Zubaydah, a top Al Qaeda detainee, had been subjected to waterboarding.

In 2008 Kiriakou confirmed that name of the chief of the CIA’s Rendition, Detention, Interrogation (RDI) teams to ABC journalist Matthew Cole, and confirmed the role of another CIA employee in classified activities regarding “black sites.”

“He gave names with that expectation that they be contacted and may choose to speak about it,” Kiriakou’s lawyer, Robert Trout, said when his client was sentenced. “Naively, he didn’t appreciate that he could lose control of it.”

Kiriakou is the first and only person linked to the controversial “enhanced interrogation” program to be prosecuted.

“… Carter is very much entangled in the shady world of the military-industrial complex. Between stints in government, he has made significant sums of cash consulting  for defense contractors, and has made money advising Goldman Sachs and Raytheon. …”

He was also once very eager to preemptively bomb North Korea, a move so aggressive that it evoked protest from then-Vice President Dick Cheney, a key architect of the bellicose Bush doctrine.

In 2006, while working at Harvard between stints at the Pentagon, Carter cowrote an op-ed in theWashington Post with former Clinton Defense Secretary William Perry entitled “If Necessary, Strike and Destroy,” in which he advocated for striking North Korea if it carried out plans for a test launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile:

Should the United States allow a country openly hostile to it and armed with nuclear weapons to perfect an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of delivering nuclear weapons to U.S. soil? We believe not. 

[…]

[I]f North Korea persists in its launch preparations, the United States should immediately make clear its intention to strike and destroy the North Korean Taepodong missile before it can be launched. This could be accomplished, for example, by a cruise missile launched from a submarine carrying a high-explosive warhead. The blast would be similar to the one that killed terrorist leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in Iraq. But the effect on the Taepodong would be devastating.

He wrote that while the Bush administration had become a tad bit overzealous about preemptive military action, “intervening before mortal threats to U.S. security can develop is surely a prudent policy.” In his eyes, diplomacy had failed and that North Korea’s weapon development posed a “mortal threat” to the United States.

Carter’s assessment is curious in light of the fact that close to a decade later, North Korea still lacks the capacity to harm the United States using nuclear weapons. The harmlessness of North Korea’s testing was so evident that Cheney, easily one of the most powerful and trigger-happy neoconservatives in American history, pushed back against the idea that such a strike was necessary or useful:

“I appreciate [their] advice,” Cheney said in an interview with CNN. “I think, obviously, if you’re going to launch strikes at another nation, you’d better be prepared to not just fire one shot. And, the fact of the matter is, I think the issue is being addressed appropriately.”

There are other questions about the choice of Carter for leading the White House’s defense operations. Recently, Alice Slater, New York director of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, pointed out that Carter is very much entangled in the shady world of the military-industrial complex. Between stints in government, he has made significant sums of cash consulting  for defense contractors, and has made money advising Goldman Sachs and Raytheon.

His selection also doesn’t bode well for proponents of nuclear disarmament. Slater says that Carter’s weapons expertise and history in the Pentagon suggests that he will not slow down the flow of cash toward nuclear weapons, as the U.S. is slated to spend around a trillion dollars on bomb factories, delivery systems, missiles, submarines, airplanes and new nuclear weapons over the next three decades.

It will be interesting to see what other details about Carter’s politics emerge as he’s sized up for confirmation by the Senate. Hagel’s departure from the White House as the Middle East is heating up again is widely considered to be a sign that Obama is interested in finding somebody both with technical know-how and a greater propensity for war. Remember: Obama has never advocated against the use of military force, but rather the manner in which it is deployed.

https://constantinereport.com/obamas-neoconservative-choice-defense-secretary-proposed-bombing-north-korea-preemptively/