July 1, 2014 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

Scotland Yard: Rupert Murdoch was Involved in "Industrial-Scale" Phone-Hacking Scandal (NY Daily News)

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

News of the World phone hacking plot traces to Rupert Murdoch himself, cops claim

Andy Coulson, former editor of the paper, was found guilty last week of conspiring to hack into voicemail messages to generate front-page news at the now defunct Sunday tabloid — and following that verdict, Murdoch was put on notice that Scotland Yard detectives want to interview him as a suspect.

BY BILL HUTCHINSON 
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, June 30, 2014

Pointing out four former editors guilty of industrial-scale phone hacking, a British prosecutor said Monday that they “utterly corrupted” Rupert Murdoch’s biggest newspaper. But a recently surfaced secret letter confirms that police suspect the wrongdoing ran all the way to the top of Murdoch’s media empire.

In the May 18, 2012, letter to Murdoch’s lawyer, Scotland Yard informed the billionaire and his henchmen that police were probing whether they were in cahoots with the corruption. The letter, obtained by the Australian Broadcasting Co.’s Four Corners program, was sent six weeks before Murdoch split his company in two — distancing his moneymaking entertainment properties from his print publications.

The probe into whether corporate charges are warranted in the case that has scandalized Fleet St. journalism appears to have been ratcheted up since Andy Coulson, the former editor of Murdoch’s News of the World, was convicted of phone hacking last week. Following Coulson’s verdict, Murdoch was put on notice that Scotland Yard detectives want to interview him as a suspect.

“I know prosecuting authorities in this country and the United States of America are seriously considering bringing charges against members of the board of the U.K. company and the American company, News Corp,” Chris Bryant, a Labour party member of the British Parliament and a phone hacking victim, told Four Corner in a piece broadcast Monday.

The sentencing hearing for Coulson and four others kicked off Monday with a prosecutor branding them as Svengalis of a criminal enterprise.

Coulson and former News of the World newsdesk editors Greg Miskiw, James Weatherup and Neville Thurlbeck sat in the London courtroom dock, all found guilty of phone hacking. They were joined by Glenn Mulcaire, the private investigator hired by the tabloid to tap phones and score news scoops.

“Between them these defendants utterly corrupted this newspaper, which became at the highest level a criminal enterprise,” prosecutor Andrew Edis said in court. “This was systemic misconduct approved and participated in by the editor himself,” he said referring to Coulson, who ran the News of the World from 2003 to 2007.

Coulson headed the tabloid during a “golden period” for hacking, Edis said.

The prosecutor scoffed at initial claims made by Murdoch’s News International that the scandal was limited to a “rogue reporter.”

“Anyone who has ever suggested or believed or was being told that the phone hacking revealed in 2006 and 2007 was the work of a single rogue reporter need only look at the four defendants in the dock,” Edis said. He said the phone hacking was of “industrial scale” with a list of victims that “read like a Who’s Who of Britain in the first five years of this century.”

The list included Prince William, Prince Harry, Kate Middleton, James Bond actor Daniel Craig and actors Jude Law and Sienna Miller.

“Between them the conspirators, hacked phones on many hundreds of occasions and of hundreds of people,” Edis said. “The full extent of the hacking will never be known.”

Defense attorney Gavin Millar had the audacity to counter that Mulcaire thought he was helping the police by hacking the voicemails of Milly Dowler, a 13-year-old girl kidnapped and murdered in 2002.

“He believed he acted with lawful authority in intercepting the answerphone of Milly Dowler with the full knowledge and authority of the police,” Millar said in court. “He believed he had been appointed lead eye, and was proud to be so highly regarded by his taskers and the police.”

Coulson — who became British Prime Minister David Cameron’s communications director after leaving News of the World — and his co-defendants are to be sentenced Friday. They each face two years in jail.

Edis revealed Coulson would be retried on charges he bribed police for royal phone directories — a count on which the jury was deadlocked.

Edis said officials were mulling whether to force Coulson to reimburse taxpayers for the $1.3 million spent on prosecuting the case.

Rebekah Brooks, the former CEO of News International who ran News of the World from 2000 to 2003, was acquitted last week of all charges connected to the phone hacking scandal.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/news-world-editor-face-charges-phone-hacking-scandal-article-1.1849115

“… The study also found that people holding left-wing political views were less willing to hurt others. One particular group held steady and refused destructive orders: ‘women who had previously participated in rebellious political activism such as strikes or occupying a factory.’ …”

Psychologists Have Uncovered a Troubling Feature of People Who Seem Too Nice

By Eileen Shim

In 1961, curious about a person’s willingness to obey an authority figure, social psychologist Stanley Milgram began trials on his now-famous experiment. In it, he tested how far a subject would go electrically shocking a stranger (actually an actor faking the pain) simply because they were following orders. Some subjects, Milgram found, would follow directives until the person was dead.

The news: A new Milgram-like experiment published this month in the Journal of Personality has taken this idea to the next step by trying to understand which kinds of people are more or less willing to obey these kinds of orders. What researchers discovered was surprising: Those who are described as “agreeable, conscientious personalities” are more likely to follow orders and deliver electric shocks that they believe can harm innocent people, while “more contrarian, less agreeable personalities” are more likely to refuse to hurt others.

The methodology and findings: For an eight-month period, the researchers interviewed the study participants to gauge their social personality, as well as their personal history and political leanings. When they matched this data to the participants’ behavior during the experiment, a distinct pattern emerged: People who were normally friendly followed orders because they didn’t want to upset others, while those who were described as unfriendly stuck up for themselves.

“The irony is that a personality disposition normally seen as antisocial — disagreeableness — may actually be linked to ‘pro-social’ behavior,'” writes Psychology Today‘s Kenneth Worthy. “This connection seems to arise from a willingness to sacrifice one’s popularity a bit to act in a moral and just way toward other people, animals or the environment at large. Popularity, in the end, may be more a sign of social graces and perhaps a desire to fit in than any kind of moral superiority.”

The study also found that people holding left-wing political views were less willing to hurt others. One particular group held steady and refused destructive orders: “women who had previously participated in rebellious political activism such as strikes or occupying a factory.”

The Nazi effect: The findings lend themselves even further to Milgram’s original goal in the ’60s: trying to understand the rise of Nazism. Milgram began his experiments in July 1961, three months after the start of the trial of German Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann. He believed his findings might help explain how seemingly nice people can do horrible things if they are ordered to do so.

Does that mean the Nazis were just nice people trying to follow orders and be polite? You probably wouldn’t want to go that far, but suffice to say, it turns out nice people just want to appease authorities, while rebels stick to their guns.

http://mic.com/articles/92479/psychologists-have-uncovered-a-troubling-feature-of-people-who-seem-too-nice

Related: The Authoritarian Personality (Studies in Prejudice), by Theodor W. Adorno (13 used from $25.00):

Frazier Glenn Cross, who is also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, looks around April 24 after being wheeled into a Johnson County courtroom for a scheduling session in Olathe, Kansas. Sen. Jerry Moran sent a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder on Friday urging a review of relevant Department of Justice protocols that led to a five-year sentence for Miller in 1987 for possessing stolen military weapons and declaring war on the country. Miller — identified as Frazier Glenn Cross in Kansas court documents — is accused of killing three people in April at two Jewish sites in Johnson County, Kansas. Moran questions whether the victims would still be alive if prosecutors had heeded their own conclusions that Miller was a danger to society in a 1987 sentencing memorandum.

BY BILL DRAPER

Southeast Missourian, June 23, 2014

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A U.S. senator from Kansas is questioning whether three people fatally shot at two Kansas City-area Jewish centers this April might still be alive if the federal government had not been so lenient a quarter-century ago with the white supremacist charged in the deaths.

In a letter sent Friday to Attorney General Eric Holder and provided to The Associated Press, Sen. Jerry Moran asks whether Department of Justice policies have changed since 1987, when federal prosecutors gave Frazier Glenn Miller a five-year sentence for possessing stolen military weapons and declaring war on the government.

“While Miller is now incarcerated and the lives lost on April 13 are irreplaceable, a rigorous assessment of relevant Department of Justice policies and protocols may spare others from the agony and grief of violence,” Moran wrote.

The Department of Justice did not immediately respond to phone messages and emails from the AP on Sunday seeking comment.

Miller — identified in Kansas court documents as Frazier Glenn Cross — is accused of killing 69-year-old William Corporon and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Griffin Underwood, in the parking lot of the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kansas. Prosecutors say Miller then went to the nearby Village Shalom senior care facility and killed Terri LaManno, 53, of Kansas City, Missouri.

Miller, 73, of Aurora, Missouri, is charged with one count of capital murder in the deaths of Corporon and Underwood, and one count of first-degree murder in LaManno’s slaying. He also faces three counts of attempted murder and is jailed on $10 million bail.

In a 1987 sentencing memorandum Moran provided to the AP, an attorney with the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division urged a federal judge to sentence Miller to five years in prison for possessing stolen military weapons and mailing out 2,000 copies of a document titled “Declaration of War” in violation of his sentence in a 1986 federal contempt case.

The two counts carried a maximum combined sentence of 15 years. Despite strong assertions in the sentencing memo that Miller was a danger to society and his crimes “could have resulted in the loss of innocent life,” prosecutors said his cooperation in the investigation of other white supremacists warranted the lesser sentence.

They also noted that if they had pursued charges for numerous other violations of federal law, Miller could have been sentenced to more than 100 years behind bars without parole.

“I am concerned that Miller’s commitment to violence and self-proclaimed unshakable white supremacist beliefs were not appropriately considered by the Department of Justice during initial plea bargain considerations and in the years following his time in federal prison,” Moran wrote.

Miller testified against more than a dozen other white supremacists, including members of a group known as The Order that were accused of plotting to overthrow the federal government. Despite his testimony, which was viewed by his peers as traitorous, each of the 14 defendants in the Fort Smith, Arkansas, trial was acquitted.

In his 1999 memoir, “A White Man Speaks Out,” Miller recounted how he enthusiastically accepted the government’s help after being told he could face up to 200 years in prison.

“I was to plead guilty to one count of felony possession of a hand grenade and answer all questions posed to me by the authorities. In return, they would recommend a 5-year prison sentence, immunity from any further prosecution by either state or federal authorities, and entrance into the federal witness protection program which included the financial support of my family while I served my sentence.

“A five-year sentence sounded a little more palatable than 200, so I accepted.”