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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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Florida: Congressional Candidate Tied to Little-Known Conservative Millionaire & Extremist Lobbying Firm

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

“… Jolly blogged for Free Enterprise Nation to keep readers abreast on plans to make military veterans pay more for health care — a politically dicey issue — and referenced ‘FEN conversations with appropriations committee staff,’ suggesting he played an active role. …”

January 31, 2014

ST. PETERSBURG — As a lobbyist-turned-congressional candidate, David Jolly has repeatedly been attacked by Democrats who say he pushed for oil drilling off Florida’s coast and represented a client who wanted to privatize Social Security — politically toxic issues in Florida.

Jolly says his opponents are flat wrong.

But a review of records and interviews show the truth is at least more nuanced and raises new questions about the Republican’s role with a little-known conservative group that hired him to advance its interests in Washington.

RELATED NEWS/ARCHIVE

The group, Free Enterprise Nation, was founded by St. Petersburg businessman James MacDougald, who has quietly become a major campaign donor in Florida and is co-chairman of Jolly’s finance team.

A few years ago, MacDougald hired Jolly to be his point man on Capitol Hill, and Jolly’s work has come full circle as he runs against Democrat Alex Sink and Libertarian Lucas Overby in a contest to replace the late Rep. C.W. Bill Young in Pinellas County’s Congressional District 13.

Lobbyists rarely run for elective office and when they do, their advocacy provides ammunition for opponents and exposes conflicts between what they were paid to do and what they may personally believe. For Jolly, those complications often lead to his work for MacDougald.

MacDougald is not well known but has big ideas. He wrote a book called Unsustainable: How Big Government, Taxes and Debt Are Wrecking America.

MacDougald argues for serious changes to Social Security and private pensions. Among his solutions: Turn Social Security into a “defined contribution” plan for anyone under 50, which would change the current system of a defined monthly paycheck.

In an interview with the Tampa Bay Times, Jolly said he does not agree with that approach and that everyone who qualifies for Social Security vesting now should have their benefits guaranteed. The reports he must file on his work as a lobbyist only vaguely refer to “Social Security reform,” which he said had to do with making clear the entitlement program’s role in the national debt.

In another instance of blurred lines, Jolly blogged for Free Enterprise Nation to keep readers abreast on plans to make military veterans pay more for health care — a politically dicey issue — and referenced “FEN conversations with appropriations committee staff,” suggesting he played an active role.

Yet in an interview Jolly bristled at the suggestion he supported higher costs for veterans, or lobbied the issue.

As for oil drilling, Jolly said those questions are simply the result of his being careful. He said he listed the name of energy legislation on his lobbyist disclosure form merely because it came up in conversation. That explanation, and others like he has made, has some experts doubtful.

“I think he’s trying to make a little revisionist history here,” said Lisa Rosenberg, a lobbyist for the Sunlight Foundation, a nonpartisan Washington group dedicated to transparency in politics. “I have never heard of anyone saying I over-complied by reporting extra issues I’m not really advocating for. This is a new one to me.”

The drilling issue was the first of several questions that have arisen since Jolly entered the race — many of them linked to Free Enterprise Nation and MacDougald.

Last week the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee accused Jolly of lobbying for an “extreme group that supports privatizing Social Security” — even though the group’s founder calls that a distortion.

“All they’re doing is keeping (Sink) under wraps and letting the DCCC hit me with outrageous and dishonest charges,” he said, as he accused Sink of ducking debates. “I’m not going to confront these questions about lobbying that much further.”

The DCCC on Friday announced another TV ad attacking Jolly as a lobbyist.

• • •

MacDougald, 70, is a former vice president of Home Life Insurance Co. of New York and co-founded ABR Information Services with his wife. They moved from New Jersey to St. Petersburg in the 1980s, and later sold the business for millions. He has become a significant political donor, contributing some $270,000.

MacDougald said that after retiring, he learned several things about government pensions, Social Security and other programs that shocked him.

He said he discovered there is no law absolutely requiring the government to pay Social Security — and that if there were, the program’s long-term liabilities would have to be included in the national debt. He said he learned public pensions have far more long-term liabilities than is generally known.

He grew so concerned that he wrote his book in 2010 and began appearing on national television to discuss it. He also poured more than $1 million into Free Enterprise Nation, which he formed to push for more transparency in public pensions; to promote private business; and to make sure Social Security payments were guaranteed.

Jolly said he does not subscribe to MacDougald’s defined contribution approach for everyone under 50, which means the government would make a set contribution to workers, who then would have investment options. He said it’s important to make sure Social Security stays solvent and pays up for everyone who has been vested in the system, which means people who have worked and paid in for 10 years.

For others — such as people who have not yet entered the workforce — there should be a wide-open discussion on reforming the program. He said everything should be on the table, including private accounts in which workers make their own investment decisions, as well as the important role of Social Security as a safety net.

“Anybody that has an intellectually honest conversation knows we have to have long-term entitlement reform in order to balance the budget,” Jolly said.

MacDougald wrote in his book that the public sector can sometimes be “socialistic.” He wrote: “Life is good in the public sector, the socialistic part of our economy, because someone else is paying for it.” Jolly said he would not have use the word “socialistic” to describe the public sector.

MacDougald said the reason he hired Jolly as a lobbyist was simple: “It was to get me in front of people I needed to talk to.” And the reason he wanted to talk to members of Congress was “so I could convince them that we need transparency from every level of government.”

• • •

But Jolly did more than make introductions, working for MacDougald over several years, first with the large firm Van Scoyoc Associates and then when Jolly opened his own lobbying firm Three Bridges Advisors. FEN paid $60,000 to Van Scoyoc and $30,000 to Three Bridges.

Some of the questions facing Jolly are the result of the precision and the vagaries of lobbying disclosure reports.

In some cases Jolly insists he noted an issue simply because it came up in a conversation. In others, he described lobbying on something so broad it’s hard to know what he meant — for example, “Social Security reform” or “health care reform.”

In a 2011 disclosure on behalf of FEN he wrote under “specific lobbying issues” legislation called “A Roadmap for America’s Energy Future,” which included proposals to expand oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico.

But Jolly says that he put it there out of abundance of caution after the legislation arose in a conversation. Jolly said he supports the current oil drilling ban in the eastern Gulf of Mexico and supports oil exploration in the central and eastern Gulf. MacDougald said his group supported the Roadmap for America’s Energy Future but that Jolly was not paid to lobby for it.

Jolly also listed that he lobbied for Free Enterprise Nation on the Paycheck Fairness Act, which Democrats have unsuccessfully pushed for in an attempt to get employers to pay women more.

Jolly said he could not remember working on the issue but in an interview said he personally opposes it. But Jolly’s report contains a very explicit mention of the issue. “I’m sure it’s something that we talked about. I can’t recall five years or four years ago what the conversation would have been,” he said.

Then there is the military health care issue. In a December 2010 blog post, Jolly also wrote about a plan to require military veterans to pay more for their government subsidized health care, a politically sensitive issue. Jolly said he did not lobby for the issue. “Find in there anywhere where I’m stating a position on Tricare or Free Enterprise Nation is,” he said.

In the blog post he wrote that then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates has “continued to demonstrate honest leadership in addressing the unsustainable formulas that dictate the department’s health care program.”

Jolly writes that “In FEN conservations with appropriations committee staff earlier this year, it is apparent that the committee has heard the secretary’s message loud and clear.” Is that lobbying? “Anybody who suggests that that paragraph suggests I was lobbying on Tricare is being intellectually dishonest,” Jolly replied in an interview.

What he wrote

David Jolly insists he did not support — or lobby for — a proposal to make veterans pay more for health care. In a 2010 blog for Free Enterprise Nation, the group founded by James MacDougald, Jolly wrote this:

5. Defense Department’s Plan to Reform Health Care Program Demonstrates Honest Leadership. Defense Secretary Robert Gates has continued to demonstrate honest leadership in addressing the unsustainable formulas that dictate the Department’s health care program, albeit with little success thus far. Congressional Appropriators have followed closely, but rejected, his proposals in past years to require military retirees to increase their individual contributions to the Department’s healthcare program (TRICARE) by as much as 500%. A retired individual in the TRICARE program currently pays approximately $230 a year for coverage and a family pays $460 a year – rates that have not increased in 15 years. According to some reports, nearly 4.5 million military retirees and their families participate in the TRICARE program, but nearly 75% of those participants have access to traditional civilian employer group plans. In FEN conversations with Appropriations Committee staff earlier this year, it is apparent that the Committee has heard the Secretary’s message loud and clear, including the Secretary’s much reported statement that health care costs are “eating the Defense Department alive.” Look for renewed debate on this proposal in 2011, and in particular the delicate dialogue of how the Congress balances the need to protect promised benefits for those who have served in uniform with the very dire financial condition of the TRICARE program. Reformers will watch closely to see how the debate plays out and what it might forecast for the debate on reform proposals for our nation’s much larger entitlement programs.

David Jolly

on behalf of the Free Enterprise Nation

Jolly’s response

“Find in there, anywhere, where I’m stating a position on Tricare or FEN is. This is a membership organization that I completed a weekly update for. . . . Anybody who suggests that that paragraph suggests I was lobbying on Tricare is being intellectually dishonest.”

Candidates for Congressional District 13 will debate live at 7 p.m. Monday at the St. Petersburg College Seminole campus. Tickets have been distributed, but it will be aired live on Bay News 9, which is partnering with the Tampa Bay Times and SPC on the event.

Media Pro: Sherman’s march

By Nicole Levy  (Excerpt)

Capital New York, January 13, 2014

SHERMAN’S SUNDAY: As Tuesday’s pushed-up publication date for Gabriel Sherman’s Roger Ailes biography, The Loudest Voice in the Room, looms, the book took its proper place in the think-ier corridors of the Sunday news cycle.

—Sherman made a stop to talk about the book on CNN’s “Reliable Sources.” “I think the thing that really surprised me and will surprise a lot of your viewers and readers of my book, is that Roger Ailes is more extreme than Glenn Beck,” he told host Brian Stelter. He said that one of his sources had told him that Ailes’s solution to the immigration problem “would be to send Navy Seal trainees to our southern border and…give them direct orders to shoot and kill anyone coming into our country.” goo.gl/BVFjCY (part 1) and full transcript: goo.gl/9Bvbuv

—The proceedings got extra self-referential when Stelter noted that CNN chief Jeff Zucker had recently told reporters that Sherman’s book confirmed that, “the Republican party is being run out of News Corp. headquarters masquerading as a news channel.” Sherman responded: “I think Zucker would kill for Ailes’ ratings. Every executive in TV would, but I think I would put it a little bit differently. Roger Ailes, with Fox News, has surpassed the GOP… He saw a day where television was going to move ahead of the political parties and, with Fox News, he has achieved it.”

The New York Times Book Review published its big, Jacob Weisberg-penned review of the book a week ahead of time online on Sunday. Calling the biography “actually fair and balanced,” the Slate editor in chief writes that Sherman ultimately struggles to come up with an answer as to why the Fox News chief has created conflict everywhere he has gone since starting in TV in the early 1960s. “Sherman says that it bothers Ailes to be the object of so much hatred, but that he can’t help provoking it,” Weisberg writes.http://goo.gl/lYdK6B

—Speaking of the Book Review: In a move widely believed to have been calculated to deflect attention from Sherman’s book, Fox has heavily promoted an authorized biography of Ailes written by Zev Chafets, which was published 10 months ago. This week, a number of ads for the Chafets book ran in The New York Times Book Review. A Times spokesperson told The Huffington Post’s Michael Calderone that the ads were purchased by The Dilenschneider Group, a strategic communications firm founded by [Knight of Malta] Robert Dilenschneider, who Sherman refers to in his book as Ailes’s “personal PR consultant.” goo.gl/iXbc2R

—David Carr’s Monday “Media Equation” column on the book focused Sherman’s huge publicity push as of late and Ailes’ calculated and aggressive pushback against it. (As we reported this week, the publisher has retained the services of powerhouse Democratic strategy firm SKD Knickerbocker to manage the message.) “What it really tells you is everything you need to know about the reality distortion field around Fox News,” Carr’s piece says of Ailes’ campaign against the book. “It refused to engage with Mr. Sherman, and then attacked him for not engaging. It rebuffed his repeated requests to interview Mr. Ailes, but still believes it would have been appropriate for him to go over all the accusations in the book, arguing that not doing so is irresponsible and not in keeping with standard journalistic practice.” http://goo.gl/QSLdjK

—WHAT’S INSIDE? Capital obtained a copy of the book in advance of its release. Here are some of the interesting things we found:

—Sherman begins his exhaustive notes section with a disclaimer and an explanation: “Roger Ailes did not participate in this book, notwithstanding my numerous attempts over two and a half years to arrange a sit-down interview. He discouraged sources close to him from speaking with me and went to elaborate lengths to obstruct my reporting. Through surrogates, Ailes attempted to create a counter-narrative about my journalism.” He also recalled the two meetings he did have with Ailes, one at a Hollywood Reporter cocktail party in New York, and another at an event in which Ailes was being honored in North Carolina.

—Fox Business Network was not Ailes’ idea, and he was never fond of it, Sherman writes: “The Fox Business Network was also a ratings disappointment to some News Corp executives. Ailes had never wanted the channel in the first place. When Murdoch tapped Ailes to launch it in 2007, Ailes told the five executives hired to run the channel, ‘the world doesn’t need another business network.’ Because the boss had signaled his lack of enthusiasm, executives took concerted steps to undermine the spinoff’s success. ‘Welcome aboard. You’re set up for failure, Ailes’ loyalist Ken LaCorte told Ray Hennessey, the new director of business news, not long after he was hired. Neil Cavuto, who was named managing editor of the channel, followed Ailes’ lead. ‘Cavuto wasn’t involved,’ an executive said.

Ailes ended up in a spat with Google, thanks in part to search results for his name: “In the fall of 2011, Ailes found himself in a row with Google after the company co-sponsored a GOP debate with Fox at the Orlando Convention Center in Florida. Michael Clemente had worked hard to develop the relationship with the Internet search giant, but the relationship did not last long. Ailes was furious that the third hit in search results for his name was a liberal blog called rogerailes.blogspot.com (‘Not affiliated with the fat FOX fuck,’ the blog informed readers at the top of its homepage). Ailes told Fox executives that he wanted Google to push the blog’s ranking down. Google told Fox that they did not intervene in such matters. Afterward, Fox canceled the partnership and did not co-host future debates with Google.”

http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/media/2014/01/8538682/media-pro-shermans-march

From The Nation:

UKIP embarrassed by member’s criminal past

February 5, 2014

LONDON: The UK Independence Party, which wants Britain to leave the EU, suffered a setback ahead of European elections after a prominent party member confirmed he had spent time in jail for being involved in a kidnapping in Pakistan. The scandal is the latest to buffet UKIP, which opinion polls show is on course to beat Prime Minister David Cameron’s Conservative party in May elections for the European Parliament and to split the centre-right vote at a national election in 2015.

BBC TV reported on Monday night that Mujeeb ur Rehman Bhutto, who had previously appeared on television as a UKIP spokesman, was the former leader of a gang in Pakistan which was behind a high-profile kidnapping in Karachi in 2004.

“As soon as we were made aware of allegations relating to this report we confronted him and he immediately resigned his membership,” UKIP said in a statement on Tuesday. UKIP has been hit by a series of scandals involving the views and background of its members. …

The BBC reported that following the kidnapping, Bhutto came to Manchester in the north of England to collect a 56,000 pound ransom payment, which was later found hidden under his bed in a house where he was staying in Leeds. Bhutto admitted conspiracy to blackmail and was jailed for seven years by a UK court in 2005. Bhutto told the BBC he had admitted the charges against him rather than risk being sent back to Pakistan and hanged. …

From The Guardian:

Quick quiz. Who said: “I have the power to give you such torture that you won’t forget it for the rest of your life”? Twenty points if you said Mujeeb Bhutto, until recently Ukip’s media-friendly “Commonwealth spokesperson”, now sadly revealed to have been the leader of a Pakistani kidnap gang who served seven years for kidnapping for ransom …

BBC:

“… In 2005, Bhutto, of Leeds, admitted being the gang’s ‘boss’ and was jailed for seven years by a UK court for conspiracy to blackmail. …”

Mujeeb Bhutto: Kidnap Gang ‘Boss’ was Conservative Activist

Convicted kidnap gang “boss” Mujeeb Bhutto was a Conservative activist before he joined the UK Independence Party, BBC Newsnight has learned.

February 4, 2014

Convicted kidnap gang “boss” Mujeeb Bhutto was a Conservative activist before he joined the UK Independence Party, BBC Newsnight has learned. In 2008, Bhutto, of Leeds, was released from prison after serving a sentence over a kidnap gang he led in Pakistan.

He joined the Tory party two months later for a year. He later joined UKIP and acted as its Commonwealth spokesman in 2013 but quit the party in December.

The Tories said an application to rejoin them had been rejected.

Newsnight has seen photographs and documents indicating Bhutto, 35, who was a Conservative Party member in 2008/9, was involved in campaigning and supporting the party between 2008 and 2011.

A letter dated June 2010, which was sent to Bhutto by senior Yorkshire-based Conservative Julia Mulligan, thanks him for his help during the May 2010 general election campaign.

‘Huge help’

“I just wanted to write to thank you for the huge amount of help you gave me during the election campaign,” said Ms Mulligan, who is now the police and crime commissioner for North Yorkshire.

“Taking on all those deliveries made an enormous difference to our ability to deliver a strong campaign.”

Ms Mulligan instructed a North Yorkshire councillor to invite Bhutto to a garden party in July 2010, so that she could meet him for the first time.

The BBC has also seen a series of emails to Bhutto which appear to suggest his attempt to rejoin the party was approved.

Mujeeb Bhutto tried to rejoin the Conservatives after leaving UKIP

In one message, dated 30 January 2014, Robert Winfield, the deputy chairman of Leeds West Conservatives, said: “I am just dropping you a brief email to say that I was delighted to learn that you have rejoined the Conservative Party.

“I hope to speak to you soon but unfortunately I am just getting over flu. I assume this means that you have severed your connections with UKIP.”

Julia Mulligan, Police and Crime Commissioner for North Yorkshire, said on Tuesday: “Mr Bhutto was one of over 300 people who volunteered to assist me during my general election campaign in Leeds in 2010.”

“As is customary, my election agent invited those who assisted with my campaign to an informal thank-you event. I cannot recall whether or not he attended and I have not seen him since”

‘Application scrutinised’

Bhutto told the BBC that he had not yet been contacted by the Conservatives to inform him that his application had been rejected. But Conservative Party chairman Grant Shapps said it had been blocked.

When presented with the email messages on the BBC’s Daily Politics programme, he said: “Every person who joins, and particularly when they join online, automatically receives a welcoming letter.

“We reserve the right to scrutinise that application. And before that person is accepted we can take a decision on their membership. He is not now a member of the Conservative Party.”

He added: “He attempted to re-join the party last week after having been the UKIP spokesman. Because he’s the spokesman for another party, we simply rejected that application.”

As revealed by Newsnight on Monday, Bhutto served as UKIP’s Commonwealth spokesman between March and December 2013. He appeared on behalf of the party on national television and radio programmes.

His role at the Conservative Party was as a grassroots activist helping with canvassing and leafleting, not as an official spokesman.

His role at the Conservative Party was as a grassroots activist helping with canvassing and leafleting, not as an official spokesman. A senior Tory party source compared his membership to someone who paid the television licence fee, saying such a person could not be seen to represent the BBC.

‘Cameron selfies’

Photographs posted to Bhutto’s deleted Facebook account show his active support of the Conservative Party before he joined UKIP. He confirmed they were his photographs and identified the people in them.

They appear to show two attempted “selfies” with David Cameron.

A third image shows Bhutto in front of a Conservative “Vote for Change” banner.

It is understood he was also active in the campaign to maintain the current Westminster voting system in a referendum in 2011, posing in pictures with MPs Nigel Evans and Stuart Andrew.

During his time with UKIP, Bhutto organised a trip to a Leeds mosque for party leader Nigel Farage and, during the 2012 Rotherham by-election, canvassed with UKIP candidate Jane Collins.

UKIP said: “When we recently became aware of possible issues relating to his past and raised the matter with him, he resigned his membership.”

Bhutto’s gang were behind a high-profile kidnapping in Karachi in 2004 and he then took a £56,000 ransom payment in Manchester.

In 2005, Bhutto, of Leeds, admitted being the gang’s “boss” and was jailed for seven years by a UK court for conspiracy to blackmail.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-26032865

Also see: Ukip chairman advocated ‘termination’ of Down’s syndrome foetuses and ‘breaking from the EU by force’ claims Tory MP