November 5, 2013 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

Major Contributors to Boehner for Speaker Committee: Lindner, Anschutz, Paulson, News Corp. Execs ...

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

Also see:John Boehner’s Ranking Campaign Contributor has a Sordid History of Corporate Crime

Boehner for Speaker Committee Stacks Up $5 Million in Third Quarter

October 15, 2013

A fundraising committee showed strong efforts by Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, when it reported raising more than $5 million in the third quarter of 2013. The Boehner for Speaker committee, a joint fundraising committee, reported it raised $5,126,453 during the third quarter and transferred the $4,408,808 in net proceeds to his campaign committee, Friends of John Boehner ($2,137,002), his leadership PAC The Freedom Project ($225,403), the Ohio Republican Party (136,534), and the National Republican Congressional Committee ($1,909,869).

The committee raised $559,390 from PACs and other committees, and $4,556,820 from individuals. Individuals giving $200 or less accounted for only $34,166. Of the itemized donors, $804,159 came from Ohio; $444,200 came from Illinois; $412,650 came from Pennsylvania; $324,600 came from Florida; $272,250 came from Texas; among others.

Major donors included Carl Lindner (executive, American Financial Corp., OH) $52,600; Edyth Lindner (homemaker, OH) $52,600; Keith Lindner (executive, American Financial Corp., OH) $52,600; S. Craig Lindner (co-CEO, American Financial Corp. OH) $52,600; James Evans (general counsel, American Financial, OH) $10,000; Joseph Consolino (executive, American Financial Group, OH) $2,500; and Vito Peraino (senior VP, American Financial Group. OH) $1,500.

Other donors were Henry Paulson (investment banker, Goldman Sachs, IL) $52,600; K. Murdoch (chairman and CEO, News Corporation, NY) $32,400; Charles Carey (CEO, News Corporation, CT) $32,400; Robert Hillis (president, Direct Supply, WI) $50,000; Miles White (CEO, Abbott Laboratories, IL) $32,400; Philip Anschutz (owner, Anschutz Corp., CO) $21,500; Michael Ward (chairman & CEO, CSX Corp.m FL) $16,000; Leslie Wexler (chairman & CEO, The Limited Corp., OH) $15,000; among others.

Update: A report filed by the Friends of John Boehner indicated that besides the transfer in from Boehner For Speaker, the Friends of John Boehner raised an additional $1 million in the third quarter, including $286,000 from PACs, $216,225 from individuals giving more than $200, and $504,699 from individuals giving $200 or less.

To search detailed money-in-politics databases, visit Political MoneyLine.

The American Family Association is once again telling its radio network’s listeners that the Obama administration is preparing the military to kill Christians. Upset that the AFA was included on an Army training session’s list of hate groups, AFA spokesman Bryan Fischer on Friday charged that the Armed Forces will use “lethal force” against Christians and Tea Party activists, and may even “surround” the hotel hosting next year’s Values Voter Summit.

“The military is being conditioned to use weapons on the American Family Association. The soldiers are being conditioned in their brains to think of evangelicals, Tea Partyers, the American Family Association and the Family Research Council as domestic enemies that may have to be neutralized by lethal force,” Fischer maintained. “The people you got to watch out for, you may have to turn your tanks on, are American Family Association.”

http://www.rightwingwatch.org/content/fischer-military-preparing-kill-christians-surround-values-voter-summit

What do right-wing billionaire Charles Koch, film director Clint Eastwood and Santa Rosa businessman Victor Trione have in common? The answer, according to WikiLeaks, the secrecy-busting website, is that they are among 2,260 men on the Bohemian Grove guest list for 2008.

Trione, chairman of Luther Burbank Savings, said he was unimpressed with the citation by WikiLeaks and unabashed by his connection with the secretive Bohemian Club.

“Yeah, absolutely, I’m a member,” said Trione, who’s attended the club’s annual summer encampment at the grove in Monte Rio since the mid-1990s. “I love it.”

Trione was one of six men with Sonoma County connections listed as summer camp “guests” by WikiLeaks, whose founder, Julian Assange, has sought asylum in the Ecuadorian embassy in London and has been labeled a traitor and a spy by U.S. politicians.

WikiLeaks issued 12 tweets this week celebrating the weekend box office flop of the movie “The Fifth Estate,” an unflattering portrait of Assange and his organization.

The Bohemian Grove list is misnamed, according to Peter Phillips, a Sonoma State University sociologist who did his dissertation on Bohemian Grove. WikiLeaks’ posting is a membership list for the San Francisco-based club founded in 1872, not a guest list, Phillips said. Club members invite guests to the summer retreat, and the club stopped releasing the guest list in the early 1990s, he said.

Activists have demonstrated at the Bohemian Grove gates for years, with complaints ranging from the event’s secrecy to allegations that the rich and powerful campers are plotting capitalist schemes or worse, engaging in devil worship.

“I don’t even think that deserves comment,” Trione said, regarding the darker imaginings.

The five other men on WikiLeaks’ list are auto dealer Henry Hansel, Petaluma composer Nolan Gasser, Occidental musician Mickey Hart, former Dolby Laboratories CEO Bill Jasper of Sonoma and the late Evert Person, former publisher of The Press Democrat who died in 2011.

All six have been previously identified in the newspaper as Bohemian Club members.

Jasper, part of the Sonoma Media Investments group that owns The Press Democrat, is an avid clarinetist who performs with other Bohemian Club members. Person lent his tenor voice to the club’s theatrical productions.

Hansel defended the club’s timber plan for the 2,700-acre grove in a Close to Home column in The Press Democrat in 2010, noting that the club had guaranteed preservation of 162 acres of old-growth trees.

Hart and Bob Weir, former members of the Grateful Dead, are among the musicians, including Jimmy Buffett, in the Bohemian fold.

Founded by San Francisco journalists, artists and musicians after the Civil War, the Bohemian Club soon included wealthy businessmen and is now the province of plutocrats and powerbrokers who welcome musicians and actors for entertainment.

Trione said he stays at the grove’s Dog House camp, populated mostly by musicians and entertainers from Los Angeles.

“They needed someone without talent who could clap,” he joked.

Prominent names on the WikiLeaks list include former Army general and Secretary of State Colin Powell, former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and Paul Pelosi, husband of House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi.

“The Bohemian Club is a private organization and does not disclose the names of its members or its guests at the Bohemian Grove,” club spokesman Sam Singer said. “The Bohemian Club cannot comment on the WikiLeaks post.”

WikiLeaks, best known for publishing secrets from the Afghanistan war and State Department diplomatic cables, said it obtained the list from “a 9/11 activist group (Truth Action).”

SF Truth Action describes itself as “a grassroots activist organization committed to raising public awareness about the true nature of the events of September 11th, 2001.”

The list is online at wikileaks.org/wiki/Bohemian_Grove_Guest_List_2008

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20131026/articles/131029647

Photo: Governor Pat McCrory, at podium, appeared with former N.C. governors Jim Martin, left, Bev Perdue and Jim Hunt, right, during a fundraising event at Blandwood Mansion in Greensboro on Tuesday. (AP Photo/News & Record, H. Scott Hoffman)

“… This offensive law is simply about suppressing the vote of people who don’t agree with the radical direction that McCrory and his General Assembly colleagues are taking North Carolina. …”

Chris Fitzsimon on spinning the ‘voter suppression’ law

Gov. Pat McCrory and other supporters of the sweeping voter-suppression law passed by the General Assembly this summer are working hard to make sure people don’t really understand how regressive and anti-democratic the law is.

They’d rather people not realize that their unmistakable goal is to make it more difficult for people to vote who are not likely to support McCrory and his far-right Republican colleagues.

Many of those voters are African-American. That’s a major reason why the U.S. Department of Justice is challenging the law in court, because the voters affected by the myriad of changes in the law are disproportionately people of color — and not just the requirement that voters show a valid government-issued photo ID at the polls.

McCrory responded to news of the lawsuit by saying that the Justice Department has overreached and that many states already had voter ID laws on the books.

McCrory loves to talk about voter ID and incessantly reminds us that you need an ID to buy Sudafed, though there’s never been a constitutional right to buy cold medicine. But he never talks about the other provisions in the law, the end to same-day registration at early voting sites, the reduction in the number of days for early voting, the elimination of pre-registration for 16- and 17-year-olds, and not allowing college students to use their school ID at the polls.

That’s not an accident. McCrory and his supporters know that only the concept of voter ID is popular with voters – as long as you don’t explain it.

The Pope-Civitas Institute recently released a survey claiming to show that almost two-thirds of independent voters support the “new election law that requires voters to show a valid photo ID before casting their ballot.” But as Bob Hall of Democracy North Carolina points out, 70 percent of voters also support allowing voters who forget their ID or don’t have one to cast a ballot anyway if they can provide a Social Security number than can be verified before their ballot is counted.

North Carolina’s new law does not include mechanisms like that for voters without IDs to cast a ballot. Most states with voter ID laws do.

That makes North Carolina’s new ID provision one of the strictest in the country, something else McCrory never admits. As Hall aptly puts it, “voter photo ID is a slogan, not a policy.” And North Carolina’s new policy is extreme.

Then there are all the other provisions that make it harder for certain people to participate in the political process.

Not too long ago there seemed to be a consensus that the more people who voted, the better it was for our democracy. It was part of the collective response to the shameful Jim Crow era, where barriers were erected to make it almost impossible for certain segments of the population to vote.

In recent years, North Carolina made big strides in increasing voter participation by passing laws, often with bipartisan support, that made it more convenient for people to register and to cast their ballot.

The result was more voters and a healthier democracy with virtually no evidence of significant voter fraud that influenced the outcome of elections. But McCrory and his Republican colleagues want to manipulate the laws and suppress the vote for their own partisan political gain.

That fact was crudely brought home recently on the Daily Show when a Buncombe County Republican official said the new elections law would “kick Democrats in the butt.”

A Republican legislator in Pennsylvania said last year the voter ID bill there would allow Mitt Romney to win the state in the presidential election.

So much for the charade about restoring integrity to elections.

This offensive law is simply about suppressing the vote of people who don’t agree with the radical direction that McCrory and his General Assembly colleagues are taking North Carolina.

There’s no integrity in that and they know it. That’s why they are working so hard to mislead us about the law and their intentions when they passed it.

NC Policy Watch

http://www.journalnow.com/opinion/columnists/article_f7d1c38e-423f-11e3-99e2-001a4bcf6878.html

Also see:Rand Paul’s plagiarism allegations, and why they matter,” Washington Post, November 4, 2013: ” … Paul hasn’t denied that the language was borrowed. Instead, he has argued that he is the victim of ‘haters‘ out to destroy his political career. … “

The accusations of plagiarism continue to pile up for Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, with new reports that an op-ed he wrote in September bears passages that closely resemble an opinion piece that had been published a week earlier. The piece Paul wrote for The Washington Times on mandatory minimums seems to contain three paragraphs that were essentially copied from an op-ed by a senior editor of The Week, as first reported by Buzzfeed.

The instance joins a growing number of Paul’s works, including speeches, his book and congressional testimony that outlets including POLITICO, MSNBC and Buzzfeed have found to contain sections that appeared copied.

Paul wrote in one section of his September piece:

 

“By design, mandatory-sentencing laws take discretion away from prosecutors and judges so as to impose harsh sentences, regardless of circumstances. Since mandatory sentencing began in the 1970s in response to a growing drug-and-crime epidemic, America’s prison population has quadrupled, to 2.4 million. America now jails a higher percentage of its citizens than any other country, including China and Iran, at the staggering cost of $80 billion a year. Drug offenders in the United States spend more time under the criminal justice system’s formal control than drug offenders anywhere else in the world.

“Most public officials — liberals, conservatives and libertarians — have decided that mandatory-minimum sentencing is unnecessary. At least 20 states, both red and blue, have reformed their mandatory-sentencing laws in some way, and Congress is considering a bipartisan bill that would do the same for federal crimes.”

 

That compares to editor Dan Stewart’s op-ed in The Week:

 

“By design, mandatory sentencing laws take discretion away from prosecutors and judges so as to impose harsh sentences, regardless of circumstances. Mandatory sentencing began in the 1970s as a response to a growing drug-and-crime epidemic, and over the decades has put hundreds of thousands of people behind bars for drug possession and sale, and other non-violent crimes. Since mandatory sentencing began, America’s prison population has quadrupled, to 2.4 million. America now jails a higher percentage of its citizens than any other country, including China and Iran, at the staggering cost of $80 billion a year.

“Most public officials — including liberals, conservatives, and libertarians — have decided that it’s not. At least 20 states, both red and blue, have reformed their mandatory sentencing laws in some way, and Congress is considering a bipartisan bill that would do the same for federal crimes.”

 

And in another section, Paul wrote:

 

“John Horner was a 46-year-old father of three when he sold some of his prescription painkillers to a friend. His friend turned out to be a police informant, and he was charged with dealing drugs. Horner pleaded guilty and was later sentenced to the mandatory minimum of 25 years in prison.

“John will be 72 years old by the time he is released, and his three young children will have grown up without him. The informant, who had a long history of drug offenses, was more fortunate — he received a reduced sentence of just 18 months, and is now free.”

 

Which resembles this paragraph from The Week:

 

“When a friend asked John Horner if he could buy some painkillers, the 46-year-old father of three didn’t see a problem. The Osceola County, Fla., resident had been taking prescribed painkillers for years after losing his eye in an accident, and agreed to sell his friend, “Matt,” four unused bottles. After the pills exchanged hands, Horner discovered that “Matt” was in fact a police informant, and he was charged with dealing drugs. At the advice of his public defender, Horner pleaded guilty, and was later sentenced to the mandatory minimum of 25 years in jail. He will be 72 by the time he is released, and his three young children will have grown up without him. “Matt,” who turned out to have a long history of drug offenses, was more fortunate — he received a reduced sentence of just 18 months after informing on Horner, and is now free.”

 

Paul has rejected the accusations as “footnote police” and “hacks and haters” trying to attack him, saying spoken word does not allow footnotes the way an academic paper would. Sunday, on ABC’s “This Week,” Paul said he wished dueling were still legal so he could issue some challenges.

He has pledged to be more cautious with his words, and some of the speeches that have been questioned have had footnotes added to the transcript hosted on his Senate website.

Monday night, Sean Hannity on his Fox News show asked Paul about his book, “Government Bullies,” which allegedly contains three pages of material from copied from think tank reports.

“I can’t always quote everything perfect. I’m not perfect. I do make mistakes. In the book in fact we made a mistake, it should have been blocked off or indented to show that it was a quotation. It was footnoted at the end,” Paul said. “We didn’t try to pass off anything as our own. And they’re coming up with these absurdities.”

Paul again brushed off the criticisms as having ulterior motives and said speeches are different than other works.

“Can a speaker not tell stories without always remembering the exact citation? I think it’s a standard that no one else is being held to and I think it’s politically motivated,” Paul said. “We’ve tried at every possible point to attribute things and nothing was ever intentionally used. We give credit to Heritage I think 15 times in the book, to Cato 12 times. And do we always do it perfectly? Maybe not, but we try.”

Paul’s office could not immediately be reached for comment early Tuesday on the op-ed.

The editor in chief of The Week told Buzzfeed that it appreciated Paul’s endorsement.

Lucy McCalmont contributed to this story.

 http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/rand-paul-plagiarism-accusations-99362.html#ixzz2jmXOB3Do