August 1, 2013 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

White House Closes Inquiry Into Afghan Massacre ... But Will Not Release Details (ProPublica)

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

Photo: Physicians for Human Rights sent forensic experts to conduct a preliminary forensic assessment of various mass graves in northern Afghanistan, including the one at Dasht-e-Leili. (Physicians for Human Rights)

Soon after taking office, President Obama pledged to open a new inquiry into the deaths of perhaps thousands of Taliban prisoners of war at the hands of U.S.-allied Afghan fighters in late 2001. Last month, the White House told ProPublica it was still “looking into” the apparent massacre. Now it says it has concluded its investigation – but won’t make it public.

The investigation found that no U.S. personnel were involved, said White House spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden. Other than that, she said, there is “no plan to release anything.”

The silence leaves many unanswered questions about what may have been one of the worst war crimes since the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, including why previous American investigations were shut down, and how evidence was destroyed in the case.

“This is not a sufficient answer given the magnitude of what happened here,” said Susannah Sirkin, director of international policy for Physicians for Human Rights, the organization that originally uncovered mass graves where the prisoners were buried.

The long saga began in November 2001, when Taliban prisoners who had surrendered to Northern Alliance commander Abdul Rashid Dostum were transported in shipping containers without food or water. According to eyewitness accounts and forensic work by human rights investigators, hundreds of men died of suffocation while others were shot, and their bodies buried at the desert site of Dasht-i-Leili.

Dostum was working closely with U.S. troops at the time. Surviving prisoners alleged that Americans were present at the loading of the containers – but the Pentagon has said repeatedly that it had no evidence that U.S. forces participated or were even aware of the deaths. (Dostum has denied any personal involvement, and claims that roughly 200 men died in transit, from battlefield wounds.)

In the fall of 2002, the U.S., U.N., and even Dostum himself expressed support for an investigation. But none got underway. In the summer of 2009, prompted by a New York Times report that Bush administration officials had actively discouraged U.S. investigations, President Obama ordered a new review of the case.

Hayden, the White House spokeswoman, said the new investigation “was led by the intelligence community,” and found that no Americans – including CIA officers, who were also in the region – were involved.

She declined to answer the following lingering questions:

  • What was the scope of the investigation? Former Bush administration officials who had been involved in the initial U.S. response to Dasht-i-Leili told ProPublica that they had not been contacted for a new inquiry. Physicians for Human Rights said it received only tepid responses to its queries from the administration over the past several years.
  • Did the investigation cover the allegations, reported in the New York Times, that Bush administration officials had discouraged inquiries by the FBI and State Department?
  • Did the U.S. help with related inquires by the U.N. or the Afghan government? Even absent direct involvement of U.S. personnel, government documents make clear that the U.S. knew about the allegations early on. The U.S. was in an alliance with Dostum, and was the de facto power in the country after the invasion. An Afghan human rights official told ProPublica last month, “I haven’t seen any political or even rhetorical support of investigations into Dasht-i-Leili or any other investigation into past atrocities, from either Bush or Obama.”
  • Did the new investigation cover revelations that graves were disturbed and evidence removed as late as 2008? What, if anything, did the U.S. do to help protect the site over the years?

A parallel investigation began by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 2010 also never made headway. The committee staffer leading that investigation was former CIA officer John Kiriakou, who is currently serving time in federal prison for revealing the name of an undercover officer to a reporter.

In letters from prison to ProPublica and an interview published recently in Salon, Kiriakou said that Secretary of State John Kerry, who was then chairman of the committee, personally called off the investigation. The State Department declined to comment, but a former Senate aide to Kerry called Kiriakou’s account “completely fabricated.”

http://www.propublica.org/article/white-house-closes-inquiry-into-afghan-massacre-and-will-release-no-details

Photo: Robert Fitzpatrick, a former FBI agent in charge of the Bureau’s Boston office

BOSTON (AP) — Prosecutors on Tuesday suggested that a former FBI supervisor exaggerated his claim that he tried to end the FBI’s corrupt relationship with reputed mobster James “Whitey” Bulger.

Robert Fitzpatrick, a former assistant special agent in charge of the Boston FBI office, testified that he tried to convince the FBI to terminate Bulger as an informant after Bulger was uncooperative and didn’t appear to be helping the bureau’s mission to gather information on the Mafia.

Fitzpatrick, the first defense witness in Bulger’s racketeering trial, began his testimony Monday and returned to the witness stand Tuesday. During cross-examination, Assistant U.S. Attorney Brian Kelly suggested that Fitzpatrick, who wrote a book on Bulger, previously embellished to sell more books and was now trumping up his account of trying to get Bulger out of the FBI fold.

“Weren’t you more concerned with your own career rather than rocking the boat?” Kelly asked.

Fitzpatrick insisted that he tried repeatedly to persuade the FBI to end its relationship with Bulger, particularly after Bulger was considered a suspect in the 1982 killings of Edward “Brian” Halloran and Michael Donahue, a shooting the reputed mobster is now accused of carrying out.

Under questioning from Bulger’s lawyer, Fitzpatrick said Bulger denied being an informant when he met with him in 1981, but was listed in FBI files as an informant who provided the agency with information on the Mafia. At the time, dismantling the Mafia was a national priority for the Justice Department.

Bulger’s lawyers have insisted that Bulger was not an informant. They say former FBI agent John Connolly fabricated reports in Bulger’s file to advance his own career.

Fitzpatrick said FBI officials would not listen when he asked them to terminate Bulger as an informant.

“They obviously felt that Bulger was the guy who was going to bring down the Mafia,” he said.

Kelly repeatedly pointed out inconsistencies between Fitzpatrick’s memory of events when he testified in federal hearings in 1988 and in civil cases brought by the families of people who were allegedly killed by Bulger. Kelly suggested that Fitzpatrick embellished his testimony to sell more copies of a book he wrote about Bulger, “Betrayal.”

Fitzpatrick acknowledged he is trying to write another book about Bulger, but said he was testifying to “tell the truth.”

Earlier Tuesday Judge Denise Casper rejected a bid by Bulger to sequester jurors while they deliberate.

Bulger’s lawyers are expected to call more former FBI agents to testify Wednesday.

” … In seizing the AP records, DOJ claimed that the news organization’s disclosure of the foiled plot had “put the American people at risk.” But, according to a May 15, 2013, NBC News report, “[T]hat assertion by Attorney General Eric Holder could be undermined by the White House’s decision to publicly comment about the operation at the time and reveal details beyond those in the original AP story.” … The Obama administration has withheld the Brennan conference call transcript from the public. … “

WASHINGTON, July 31, 2013 /Judicial Watch announced today that on June 21, 2013, it filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit (Judicial Watch, Inc. v. Central Intelligence Agency (No. 1:13-cv-00946)) against the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) seeking access to information regarding a May 2012 conference call between then-Obama counterterrorism adviser John Brennan and select TV terrorism consultants regarding a foiled terrorist plot to bomb a U.S. aircraft scheduled to fly from Yemen to the United States.

The Brennan conference call lies at the heart of The Associated Press (AP) defense against the sweeping secret subpoena of the press association’s phone records by the Obama Department of Justice (DOJ). In seizing the AP records, DOJ claimed that the news organization’s disclosure of the foiled plot had “put the American people at risk.”

But, according to a May 15, 2013, NBC News report, “[T]hat assertion by Attorney General Eric Holder could be undermined by the White House’s decision to publicly comment about the operation at the time and reveal details beyond those in the original AP story, according to legal experts and counterterrorism officials.” The Obama administration has withheld the Brennan conference call transcript from the public.

By letter on March 21, 2013, the CIA acknowledged receipt of Judicial Watch’s request on March 5, 2013. The letter stated that it was unlikely the CIA could respond to the request within 20 working days as required by law, adding, “You have the right to consider our honest appraisal as a denial of your request and you may appeal to the Agency Release Panel.” Because the statement was not an adverse determination within the meaning of the law, however, no administrative appeal was possible. Hence, the June 21 FOIA lawsuit.

On May 7, 2012, AP broke the story of the foiled airliner bomb plot, reporting:

The CIA has thwarted a plot by al-Qaida’s affiliate in Yemen to destroy a US-bound airliner using a bomb with a new design around the one-year anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden.

The plot involved an upgrade of the underwear bomb that failed to detonate aboard a jetliner over Detroit on Christmas 2009.
According to Reuters, following the breaking of the story by AP, Brennan, then a top White House adviser on counterterrorism, conducted a teleconference with select former counterterrorism advisers, who had become TV news commentators, to privately brief them on yet unrevealed details of the foiled Yemeni plot. While Brennan assured the commentators that “the plot was never a threat to the U.S. public or air safety because Washington had ‘inside control’ over it,” his comments reportedly “helped lead to disclosure of the secret at the heart of a joint U.S.-British-Saudi undercover counter-terrorism operation.”

NBC News reported, “Brennan later told the Senate Intelligence Committee that he conducted the briefing to avoid ‘dangerous questions and speculation’ about the operation.”

Despite Brennan’s briefing for TV terrorism consultants revealing secret details of the Yemen operation, the Washington Post reported on May 13, 2013, “In a sweeping and unusual move, the Justice Department secretly obtained two months’ worth of telephone records of journalists working for the Associated Press as part of a year-long investigation into the disclosure of classified information about a failed al-Qaeda plot last year.” According the article, federal authorities obtained cellular, office and home telephone records of individual reporters and an editor; AP general office numbers in Washington, New York and Hartford, Conn.; and the main number for AP reporters covering Congress.

“This is truly classic: the Obama administration stonewalling the release of the details of a briefing to the press,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “One might conclude that the cover-up related to this antiterrorism briefing has something to do with minimizing the controversy of their extraordinary investigation into the Associated Press over its reporting on the topic covered in this very same briefing.”

6-02-05

According to US government documents, Cuban exile and known terrorist Luis Posada Carriles participated in the Iran-Contra scandal, a program carried out illegally by the Reagan administration whereby arms were sold secretly to Iran and the proceeds from the sales were funneled illegally to the rebel group known as the “Contras” in Nicaragua.

Posada, 77, recently turned up in Panama and traveled through Mexico to Miami, Florida where he was detained by US immigration authorities. He has applied for asylum.

At the time of his arrest, Posada was using the fake identity he had assumed while working as a CIA operative on and off from mid-1960s through the 1980s, including work on the Iran-Contra arms deal. Using this identity suggests that he intended for the US government to locate him.

Posada is being held in El Paso, Texas awaiting an immigration hearing in mid-June.

According to an Associated Press story, US government documents show that Posada, using his phony identity, aided in funneling arms to the Contras through a US-controlled airbase in El Salvdaor in 1985.

Posada escaped from a Venezuelan prison 20 years ago, convicted of numerous terrorist activities, and subsequently became deeply involved in the Reagan administration’s illegal and secret arms deal, according to the final Iran-Contra report issued by independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh. The arms deal raised funds for the Contras, a US-organized rebel group in Nicaragua created for the sole purpose of overthrowing the left-leaning Sandinista government in that country.

The Sandinistas led a successful rebellion against the US-installed Somoza dictatorship in 1979. Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega was elected to the presidency of Nicaragua in 1984. This and the fact that Ortega established friendly relations with the Soviet Union earned the ire and ultimately a US-backed armed intervention.

After Ortega’s rise to the presidency, Posada used the name “Ramon Medina” and worked closely with another militant Cuban exile known as “Max Gomez” at the major Contra staging area at Ilopango Air Base in El Salvador. “Max Gomez” was an alias for Felix Rodriguez, a long-time CIA operative.

According to the Walsh report, Posada helped distribute the $6 million collected illegally for the Contras by Oliver North, a White House aide who directed the operation. The cash and supplies were shipped to El Salvador through a CIA front in Miami.

Oliver North was criminally charged and sentenced for his role in the project, but did not serve time under an “immunity agreement” arranged with the Senate committee that held hearings on the matter.

Observers of the scandal believe that North’s immunity deal resulted from his willingness to take the fall for other Reagan administration officials, including the president and the vice president.

Posada’s role, as well as that of Rodriguez, was revealed when a US military plane was shot down in Nicaragua carrying funds and supplies to the Contra operatives in Nicaragua. A crew member on the flight confessed to many of the details of the operation.

Posada’s terrorist career began with training by the CIA in the use of explosives as part of the ill-fated Bay of Pigs invasion, according to the Washington Post. FBI and CIA documents revealed by Freedom of Information Act requests show that in the 1960s and 1970s, Posada was engaged in numerous terrorist plots to blow up various non-military targets throughout Latin America linked to Cuba or the Soviet Union.

Posada also helped Venezuelan secret police hunt leftists in the 1970s. FBI documents state that Posada was an organizer of the 1976 bombing of a Cuban civilian airliner that killed 73 people. In addition, Posada has publicly admitted to participating in a wave of terrorist bombings in Cuban tourist hotels that killed an Italian tourist and injured 11 other people and is tied to a 2000 plot to assassinate President Fidel Castro.

Public records show that Posada has had relationships with the Cuban American National Foundation, an anti-Castro organization, and to the Miami-based Cuban American mafia.

Posada’s presence in the US has posed a major conundrum for the Bush administration. If they protect a person accused of terrorism, it undercuts their threats to other countries suspected of protecting terrorists. On the other hand, Posada is a long-time CIA operative who knows things they prefer not to be publicized.

So far the administration hasn’t made up its mind and continues to harbor the terrorist.

http://www.politicalaffairs.net/harboring-a-terrorist-posada-carriles-and-the-iran-contra-affair/