May 14, 2013 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

Daily Beast on "The Daniel Morgan Murder: An Unsolved Mystery of the Murdoch Hacking Scandal"

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

Also see:The murder of Daniel Morgan: A crime the police wouldn’t solve,” independent.co.uk

On Friday, Britain’s home secretary opened a judge-led public inquiry into the brutal and mysterious 1987 slaying of Daniel Morgan. Peter Jukes talks to Alastair Morgan, who hopes the decades-long cover-up of his brother’s death may finally be revealed.

It is Britain’s biggest unsolved murder, and described by a senior police officer as “the pivotal crime of the times.”

It plunges into the heart of what former prime minister Gordon Brown called the “criminal-media nexus” exposed by the hacking and bribes scandal that engulfed Rupert Murdoch’s British tabloid titles. Only on this occasion the crimes went well beyond privacy intrusion and corrupt payments, to a brutal killing.

On Friday, home secretary Theresa May announced a judge-led public inquiry into the murder of Daniel Morgan, who was found with an axe embedded in his head in a South London car park in 1987. The panel of experts will examine not only the police corruption that sabotaged five successive police investigations and caused the subsequent murder trial to collapse, but also the “connections between private investigators, police officers and journalists at the News of the World and other parts of the media and corruption involved in the linkages between them.”

Daniel Morgan ran a successful private investigations agency, Southern Investigations, with Jonathan Rees in the 1980s. However, as explained to The Daily Beast by his brother Alastair, Daniel had become suspicious of his business partner and concerned about police corruption. He was preparing to expose local police officers to the now-shuttered News of the World according to another colleague. But after a meeting with Rees, Daniel was murderedOne of the officers to first investigate the murder, Sid Fillery, left the police and took over Daniel’s role at Southern Investigations. Over the next two decades Fillery and Rees formed one of the most prolific private detective agencies working for the British press, and established what the investigative journalists Nick Davies and Vikram Dodd described as an “empire of corruption.”

According to the Guardian they provided material, mainly for News of the World, through a variety of illegal means, including paying police officers for confidential records, obtaining phone records, care registration details, banks account details, and allegedly using ‘Trojan Horse’ emails to hack computers. According to two sources, the firm “commissioned burglaries to obtain material for journalists.”

A senior police source described the Morgan murder and the Rees-Fillery partnership as the origin of the illegal practices exposed by the hacking scandal. “Their relationship with News of the World,” the source said “was without question the maternity ward where the Dark Arts were born.”

Meanwhile Southern Investigations was still subject to no less than five police investigations at a cost of some $50 million. The police planted an undercover officer in the agency, and had the offices bugged. However, most of the material has never been released.

“Morgan and his partner’s relationship with News of the World was without question the maternity ward where the Dark Arts were born.”

Further police investigations were deliberately sabotaged by employees of News of the World. David Cook, who led two of inquiries, had his phone hacked by the tabloid, his house watched, and his family followed. As his former wife and police officer Jacqui Hames explained to the Leveson Inquiry Press ethics last year, the surveillance was due to “collusion between people at News of the World and those suspected of the murder.”

When confronted about the surveillance, then editor of News of the World Rebekah Brooks claimed it was a legitimate investigation to see if Cook and Hames were ‘having an affair’—though they had children and had been married for years.

Rees was sentenced for seven years over a separate crime in 2000, but was promptly rehired upon his release by Andy Coulson—an editor who had taken over from Brooks as editor of News of the World, and would soon move over to become Prime Minister David Cameron’s press supremo.

According to Alastair Morgan, the terms of reference of the new inquiry have been under discussion for months. “It was only the hacking scandal and the Leveson Inquiry which brought this back into the spotlight,” he told The Daily Beast.  Modelled on the recent Hillsborough Panel, which last year revealed police misconduct and press lies about the death of 96 Liverpool supporters at a football stadium in the 1989, Alastair hopes the inquiry will at least expose the cover-up, although— because of the “legal nightmares of previous investigations”— he doubted those behind the murder would ever be brought to justice.

David Cook, who ran two of the murder inquiries, compared the Morgan case to another notorious South London murder, the racist killing of black teenager Stephen Lawrence in 1996, which also took decades to come to justice “but instead of race being the issue, this time it is about corruption.”  “This whole saga could best be described as an iceberg,” Cook told the Daily Beast. “What you see on the surface is nothing to what lies underneath.”

Campaigning Labour MP Tom Watson, a key figure in exposing the phone hacking scandal through Parliament, believes that the new inquiry—with power to examine all the police documents going back to 1987—could prove historic. “By the end of this process we should know more about a very opaque period in British history when corrupt police, private investigators, and tabloid journalists worked together,” he said. Watson told The Daily Beast he was particularly interested in what happened to the material garnered in the late 1990s concerning “the relationship between Southern Investigations and News of the World.” He hoped there will be a full investigation of what senior officers really knew back then.

Above all, however, Watson wanted to pay tribute to the Morgan family for their often lonely and unheard campaign. Two decades ago Alastair Morgan made solemn promise to his dead brother that he “would not rest” until the corruption was exposed. As the public inquiry gets under away later this year, his pledge may at last be honoured.

Peter Jukes is an author based in London. His second nonfiction book, Fall of the House of Murdoch, which puts the current scandal against the half-century rise of News Corp., was published by Unbound earlier this year.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/05/10/the-daniel-morgan-murder-an-unsolved-mystery-of-the-murdoch-hacking-scandal.html

Photo: Donald Trump — The Trump Organisation told the Sunday Herald that the advert was approved by Committee of Advertisement Practice.

Environmental campaigners have welcomed reports that an anti-wind farm advert by Donald Trump is to be banned.

The newspaper adverts featured a photograph of First Minister Alex Salmond and linked the Government’s support of wind farms with the decision to release Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, the man convicted of the Lockerbie bombing.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) will publish a report this week condemning it as misleading.

The advert prompted 21 complaints, including one from Green party leader Patrick Harvie.

The MSP said: “Only a sick mind would link renewables policy with Lockerbie victims and while the ASA says the advert did not breach its code in terms of offence, it agrees it was distasteful. It also agrees that both the claim about tourism and the use of an American image were misleading. I believe Mr Trump owes an apology for his crass behaviour.”

The ASA decision is the second such ruling against the Trump Organisation over their anti-wind farm campaign. An earlier advert was banned for exaggerating the number and type of turbines used in Scotland.

Mr Harvie added: “He didn’t have a shred of evidence that tourism would suffer when we quizzed him in Parliament, and he’d already been censured by the authorities for anti-renewables adverts. The fact he went ahead and placed further adverts demonstrates his ignorance and arrogance yet again.”

WWF Scotland director Lang Banks said: “The advert was pretty distasteful, and it’s now been shown to be factually wrong too.

“If the evidence to be presented at his forthcoming court challenge is as flimsy as that used to create this misleading advert then it’s likely to be a very short case.”

George Sorial, executive vice president of the Trump Organisation told the Sunday Herald that the advert had been approved in advance by the Committee of Advertisement Practice (CAP).

He told the newspaper: “We actually wanted the content to be much stronger because Scotland is facing an economic and environmental meltdown.

“The fact that the ASA has now clearly contradicted the advice of CAP demonstrates how disorganised, inefficient and wasteful these agencies are.”

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Federal authorities in Puerto Rico have arrested an executive at Pfizer Pharmaceutical for allegedly producing child pornography.

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Federal authorities in Puerto Rico have arrested an executive at Pfizer Pharmaceutical for allegedly producing child pornography.

Officials say 48-year-old Reinaldo Diaz Camacho was charged after Puerto Rico police received information that he was having sexually explicit conversations with a 16-year-old boy on Facebook.

U.S. Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodriguez said Thursday that the boy’s mother told authorities she had seen the conversations on her son’s cellphone.

Rodriguez says Diaz had sent the boy sexually explicit images via Facebook and text messages. She says a federal agent then posed as the teen on Facebook and continued to interact with Diaz. She says Diaz asked the boy to send naked pictures of himself.

It was not immediately clear whether Diaz has an attorney.

http://seattletimes.com/html/nationworld/2020956171_apcbpuertoricochildpornography.html

Also see: Daily Beast: ‘New Book Reveals Postwar Germany’s Nazi Party Ties Cover-Up’

For decades, the post-war German government negotiated with the US to obtain lists of former Nazi party members. New research shows that German diplomats may have intentionally delayed obtaining the information. For years, Germany’s treatment of its own Nazi past appeared to have been thorough. Various publications are dedicated to all aspects of the Nazi dictatorship in Germany from 1933 to the war’s end in 1945. But in reality, there were large gaps in the German public’s knowledge. Until 1994, for example, it was difficult to say who, exactly, had been a member of Adolf Hitler’s NSDAP party.

Since the war’s end, party membership files were stored at the US-run Berlin Document Center (BDC). Despite repeated official requests by the German government over the course of decades, the US refused to part with the lists. But according to German author and journalist Malte Herwig, US obstinacy was not to blame. To the contrary: Herwig found documents which appear to prove that Germany did not truly want the explosive files.

‘The depth of denial’

Through his research, Herwig came upon documents that he feels clearly demonstrate Germany’s reluctance to make the files public. In one, the US mission in Berlin writes that it was “upset that the German government publicly requested the return of the Nazi files, but through diplomatic channels indicateed: We may be demanding this publicly, but please answer just as publicly that you can by no means return the data,” the researcher says.

Did the German government really thwart attempts to return the information to Germany? Historian Hans Mommsen views that as unlikely. “I wouldn’t use the word thwart,” he told DW. “I have the feeling that they dealt with things more bureaucratically.”

Thus far, Germany’s Federal Foreign Office has refrained from weighing in on the issue.

But it was inside the archives at the Foreign Ministry that Malte Herwig found evidence of delay tactics used by the German government. He stumbled upon “notes of a conversation from 1986, in which there was an estimation that six to seven years would have to elapse, and then the issue would become unproblematic.” It was at this point that Herwig became alarmed. “That, you really have to say, is an abyss of denial on the part of the state,” Herwig said. “I wouldn’t have thought that possible.”

‘Tell a lie and stick to it’

The word “unproblematic” was one Herwig came across repeatedly in the files of Germany’s Foreign Ministry. For the author, the “problem” in question was clear. Highly “problematic” would be the likelihood that high-ranking West German political leaders and diplomats might appear on the list of former Nazi party members.

Of particular concern, Herwig says, was the name of Hans-Dietrich Genscher. “[He was] the leader of the same ministry that was responsible for negotiating the return of that list,” Herwig said.

Genscher was Germany’s Foreign Minister between 1974 and 1992 and denied DW’s request for an interview – due to time constraints, he said.

The historian Mommsen, however, views Herwig’s discoveries as a “tempest in a teapot.”´”The people who were responsible for these materials, and whom I still know personally, were surely not the kind of people who would’ve tried to hide their office from the blemish of National Socialism,” Mommsen said.

That assessment isn’t shared by Herwig, who prefers to ask a different question entirely: Why have so many people – among them, prominent politicians – kept their lips sealed about their former party membership? It would’ve been easy, Herwig believes, to have simply said, “I was young and made a mistake, but recognized that mistake later.” At the end of the Second World War, Hans-Dietrich Genscher was 18 years old.

As part of his research, Malte Herwig interviewed former German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, in whose cabinet sat many former members of the Nazi party and who himself fought as a soldier in the Second World War.

“I asked Mr. Schmidt, ‘Why, today, can these people still not say that, when they were 17 years old, they joined the Nazi party?’ “And Schmidt said [in English], ‘Tell a lie and stick to it.'”

Not ‘meaningful’

Another reason the back-and-forth negotiations at the US-run Berlin Document Center still manage to shock today is that Germany’s Foreign Ministry allowed its own past to be researched by independent investigators eight years ago. The general impression then was that the office had been forthcoming with regard to its own history.

In 2005, then-German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer established an independent commission of historians to clear up the history of the foreign ministry. In 2010, the commission delivered the results to Fischer’s successor, Guido Westerwelle, under the title “The Office and the History.”

Both historian Hans Mommsen and journalist Malte Herwig were critical of those results. For Mommsen, they just weren’t meaningful. “In some sense it was arbitrary, since they really only studied certain aspects,” Mommsen said.

For Herwig, the appointment of the committee was itself a dubious act. “The foreign ministry was being hunted,” Herwig said. “The historical commission’s study took place due to outside pressure only.”

Opening up

As for Herwig’s own work, it hasn’t been “thwarted.” Quite the opposite: “I was supported throughout my research in the archives. All their documents were laid open to me, including classified files.” Previously, those documents had been kept secret.

Although the German and American archives turned up nothing flattering about the foreign ministry, Herwig is convinced as to the current sincerity of the ministry. “I believe the foreign ministry is ready to clear things up.”

From the files themselves, but also from the reluctance of multiple German governments until as late as 1994, much remains to be learned,

http://www.dw.de/did-germany-cover-up-a-decades-old-nazi-list/a-16798605