February 23, 2013 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

Appeal Filed in $93-Million Monsanto Class-Action Agent Orange Settlement

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

Some class members plan to appeal a $93 million settlement in a class-action lawsuit against Monsanto

By Kate White

The Charleston Gazette, February 20, 2013

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Some class members plan to appeal a $93 million settlement in a class-action lawsuit against Monsanto. Attorneys Tom Urban, of Arlington, Va.,  and Ruth McQuade, of Shepherdstown, filed separate notices to appeal with the West Virginia Supreme Court on Wednesday.

On Jan. 25, circuit Judge Derek Swope approved the settlement in a 385-page order, which grants medical monitoring and property cleanup to Nitro residents in regard to dioxin pollution of their community.

The notice of appeal is the first step under the new rules of appellate procedure adopted by the state Supreme Court in December 2010. The high court will decide whether to hear the case.

For more than 50 years, the former Monsanto plant in Nitro made herbicides, rubber products and other chemicals. The plant’s production of Agent Orange, a defoliant deployed widely in the Vietnam War, created dioxin as a toxic chemical byproduct.

The company agreed to a 30-year medical monitoring program with a primary fund of $21 million for initial testing and up to $63 million in additional money dependant on what levels of dioxin are found in residents.

The medical monitoring and cleanup provisions of the case cover residents within a smaller area than was included in the original class-action area, with the settlement focused on an area where experts for the plaintiffs’ lawyers believed dioxin emissions from Monsanto were most likely to have put residents at risk of future pollution-related diseases.

McQuade writes that the court abused its discretion by approving the settlement “that provides no consideration to 95 percent of the settlement class.” The notice also alleges “serious intra-class conflicts of the kind that have led to rejection of settlements by the United States Supreme Court and federal courts of appeals.”

Also, “an overbroad class definition that has the effect of releasing the claims of persons not properly before the court and who had no standing to bring a claim in this case,” according to McQuade’s filing.

She believes the court erred allocating benefits, as it treats class members differently.

The notice alleges lead plaintiff’s attorney Stuart Calwell “suffered from a conflict of interest in negotiating monetary settlements on behalf of his personal injury clients at the same time as he was negotiating the settlement on behalf of absent class members, when the absent class members will not have similar access to monetary payments should they subsequently develop one of the diseases which were alleged by class counsel’s personal injury plaintiffs.”

She also takes issue with attorney’s fees the settlement granted.

The judge approved up to $29.5 million in fees and costs for Calwell’s firm, but made $9.5 million of that contingent upon the number of people who eventually qualify for the settlement and how many residents show certain levels of dioxin in their blood.

“…federal law clearly limits an award of attorneys’ fees to a reasonable percentage of settlement benefits actually claimed by and paid to class members, and not based upon potential maximum benefits, unless funds are actually paid into escrow and each class member may claim his or her share upon proof of identity,” McQuade writes.

Calwell said Wednesday that McQuade’s notice of appeal was a “rehash of what was covered before thoroughly and covered in Swope’s order.”

Urban has taken issue with the settlement since details about it emerged. He argues that the settlement was the result of collusion between Calwell and Monsanto attorneys, as he stated at a fairness hearing last year.

The settlement, Urban writes in his notice of appeal, “denies more than 75,000 people their ability to ever sue Defendants again to obtain medical monitoring for exposure to known hazardous substances (dioxins) even though these persons received absolutely no benefit or compensation whatsoever, in violation of the Constitutions of the United States and West Virginia.”

Urban contends, like McQuade, that Calwell had a conflict of interest dealing with class members and personal injury clients. He also takes issue with the way the judge handled attorney’s fees in the case.

He argues class members should have been allowed to “opt out” of the property remediation portion of the settlement as, “owners of 7,500 residences who would receive no benefit under the settlement, but would forever lose their right to sue Defendants.”

The property cleanup portion of the settlement was unforeseen after Judges O.C. Spaulding and Swope issued rulings last year that threw out that part of the case. Even though the decertification of the property class had been appealed, a Supreme Court decision probably wouldn’t have happened anytime soon.

“Did the Circuit Court have jurisdiction to vacate the decertification of or ‘recertify’ the Property Remediation Class when an appeal was pending before this Court related to that decertification?” Urban wrote.

http://wvgazette.com/News/201302200054

Also see: “Knight of Malta CEO of Firm that Built Planes for Hitler to Run Vatican Bank

The Scotland Herald, February 17, 2013

The Vatican’s bank, the Institute for Works of Religion (the IOR), acquired a sulphurous reputation in the 1970s when its American head, Archbishop Paul Marcinkus, went into business first with Michele Sindona, a Cosa Nostra-linked financier who would end up convicted of bankruptcy and murder, and then Roberto Calvi, who would be found hanged under Blackfriars Bridge in London following the fraudulent collapse of his Banco Ambrosiano.

But the bank’s reputation for skulduggery goes back further, almost to its inception in 1942. According to American intelligence documents cited by the author Ferruccio Pinotti, a group of leading Italian industrialists met in Turin in 1945 to discuss how to conduct the forthcoming war against communism in Italy.

One of their first moves was to deposit a large sum in the Vatican, presumably in the newly-founded Vatican Bank.

Licio Gelli, the former head of the outlawed P2 masonic lodge, which counted ministers, secret service chiefs and other representatives of the Italian elite among its members, now effectively acknowledges that both the Vatican and the CIA were allies in his organisation’s struggle against Marxism.

For example, Cardinal Alfredo Ottaviani, chief doctrinal watchdog at the Holy Office until the mid-1960s, was a friend with whom Gelli dined frequently, despite official Catholic disapproval of freemasonry.

“One might say Cardinal Ottaviani was our spiritual father, because he was from the very far right,” Gelli told me in a recent interview. “He had a sister who was even more fascist than Mussolini,” Gelli laughed, remaining an unrepentant fascist himself.

He also admits to knowing successive CIA station chiefs in Rome, sometimes taking new arrivals on an introductory tour of the country.

Gelli also said that Marcinkus had participated in the war on communism. “Above all he was there to make money,” the former masonic leader said. Marcinkus, an American of Lithuanian origin, used to handle security on foreign trips for Pope John Paul, collecting financial contributions from Catholic industrialists in the countries the Pope visited.

It was Calvi, Gelli said, whose Banco Ambrosiano had been squeezed to finance anti-communist operations, including subsidising the Polish trade union, Solidarity.

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/world-news/bankruptcy-the-mafia-suicide-and-murder-the-dark-history-of-the-vatican-bank.20248652

Also see:SourceWatch on Mantech” and “Domestic Spying, Inc.

Press Release

FAIRFAX, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–ManTech International Corporation (NASDAQ:MANT) named Brian McHugh Vice President for Program Development and Risk Management. McHugh will develop and implement national security programs that align with customers’ missions and resources, and support a number of highly-specialized, ongoing programs aimed at protecting the homeland. McHugh will also advise ManTech’s Board of Directors and executive management team on risk mitigations for operations worldwide. McHugh brings with him 28 years of Intelligence Community experience.   

“ManTech is excited to welcome Brian to our  team. He brings a unique understanding of the Intelligence Community’s diversity”

McHugh retired from the Central Intelligence Agency this year following a distinguished career protecting U.S. interests at home and abroad. He served as Chief of Station in various Middle Eastern and European locations, including theaters of conflict. He managed programs focused on countering international terrorism, weapons proliferation, counterintelligence, and cyber threats directed against the homeland. These complex, multimillion dollar and multiagency programs received heavy Congressional oversight and required that he work closely with foreign partner governments, senior U.S. military commanders, and policymakers. He developed substantive expertise in the Middle East, South Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans.

McHugh most recently served as the Associate Executive Assistant Director of the National Security Branch at the Federal Bureau of  Investigation (AEAD/FBI) where he oversaw the FBI’s counterterrorism, counterintelligence, weapons of mass destruction, and cyber security issues impacting national security. Mr. McHugh supervised various domestic and international operations focused on bringing terrorists to justice and preventing acts of terror against U.S. citizens. He also served with the Department of Defense at Fort Meade, Maryland as an analyst and regional expert.

“ManTech is excited to welcome Brian to our  team. He brings a unique understanding of the Intelligence Community’s diversity,” said L. William Varner, president and chief operating officer of ManTech’s Mission, Cyber and Intelligence Solutions (MCIS) group. “He will play an important role in developing solutions that maximize resources and align with each government customer’s unique requirements and culture.”

McHugh received several senior career Intelligence awards. He graduated with honors from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana where he earned recognition as a Phi Beta Kappa and James Scholar. He conducted post-graduate and professional studies at the University of Ankara in Turkey, Northwestern University, and George Washington University.

About ManTech International Corporation

ManTech is a leading provider of innovative technologies and solutions for mission-critical national security programs for the intelligence community; the Department of Defense, including its health organizations; the departments of State, Homeland Security, Energy and  Justice, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); the space community; and other U.S. federal government customers. We provide support to critical national security programs for approximately 60 federal agencies through approximately 1,000 current contracts.       ManTech’s expertise includes command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) lifecycle support; cyber security; global logistics support; intelligence/counter-intelligence support; information technology (IT) modernization and sustainment; systems engineering; test and evaluation; and health IT. ManTech supports major national missions, such as military readiness, terrorist threat detection, information security and border protection. Additional information on ManTech can be found at www.mantech.com.

Related:

ManTech Wins $77M For FBI IT, Info Sharing Support; Bill Varner Comments:

May 21, 2012 at 10:47 am

[…] Bill Varner, president and chief operating officer of mission, cyber and intelligence solutions, said the company’s Fairmont, W.V. office will perform the work for the bureau’s IT and identification systems. […]

ManTech Names Chris Goodrich SIGINT, Cyber Operations SVP; Bill Varner Comments says:

June 12, 2012 at 9:12 am

[…] Bill Varner, president of the mission, cyber and intelligence solutions group, said Goodrich uses his experience from the intelligence community to grow business in Maryland. [.]

James Morgan New CFO at ICF International: Executive Mosaic’s Weekly News Round-Up – Executive Mosaic says:

June 15, 2012 at 10:57 am

[…] Bill Varner, president of the mission, cyber and intelligence solutions group, noted Goodrich’s intelligence community background have fed into his responsibilities to grow IT, cyber and intelligence operations in the state.  CSC to Migrate FAA Users to Microsoft Cloud Email on $91M Award  The Federal Aviation Administration has awarded Computer Sciences Corp. a close to $100 million award implement a cloud computing infrastructure equipped with Microsoft Office 365. […]

ManTech Announces New Cyber SVP Role for Eric Eifert; Bill Varner Comments says:

August 31, 2012 at 9:45 am

[…] Bill Varner, chief operating officer of the mission, cyber and intelligence solutions group, said Eifert has helped build the cyber defense business since he joined the company in 2001 as a computer forensics engineer. […]

ManTech Names SAIC Vet Fleetwood Lilley a Cyber Contracts VP; Bill Varner Comments says:

September 12, 2012 at 8:51 am

[…] brings 28 years of contracts oversight and cyber-centric leadership,” said Bill Varner, president and chief operating officer of the MCIS […]

Executive Mosaic’s Weekly News Round-Up 10/11/12 – Executive Mosaic says:

October 12, 2012 at 9:04 am

[…] is a take from Bill Varner, president and COO of ManTech International‘s mission, cyber and technology […]

By Amna Baig (Excerpt)

The Express-Tribune Blogs, February 17, 2013

With John O Brennan’s brainchild, the ‘play book’, almost ready for the president to sign and the leak of the Justice Department’s document explaining the legal rationale for the killing of American citizens who join al Qaeda, the drone debate is a hot topic once again. But for all the wrong reasons.

A brief introduction to the playbook would be that it sets rules regarding the clandestine drone operations of CIA around the world, a vague attempt at legalising the attacks and ‘minimising’ them to an extent. Something like this needed to be done by the US government as it was facing heavy criticism not only from its allies but also from its own people regarding the heavy reliance on technological warfare.

Maybe the entire clamour around the globe for a reduction in drone strikes is way of securing or asking what the future holds as the US is blatantly using its might to carry out operations attacking the sovereignty of fragile third world countries. …

There has been a gradual escalation in number of these attacks since the start of this year. Around 11 civilians died within the first two weeks of January in four attacks as reported by Bill Roggio of the Long war journal. During March 2011, a single ‘Signature (precision)’strike killed 38 civilians. It’s almost close to impossible to assess the civilian death toll of such strikes as the areas targeted by the CIA drones are inaccessible to government functionaries, journalists and other monitors. …

Full Story

http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/world/

Related: A Timeline of CIA Atrocities

” … A new stereotype has emerged: The CIA is neither an idiot nor a sinister killer, and its agents are no longer thin-lipped Machiavellian spooks, pulling the strings of international intrigue. … Jennifer Garner, star of Alias, and later Ben Affleck’s wife, did a recruitment video for the agency in 2004, which was posted on the CIA website and used at college employment fairs. … “

By LIAM LACEY

The Globe and Mail, Feb. 21 2013

They both like to dress up, spin fictions and keep their unsavoury behaviour out of the headlines: No wonder the CIA and Hollywood are such a natural couple, though they’ve only recently stepped into the limelight together.

Two of the more prominent films in Oscar contention celebrate the triumphs of the Central Intelligence Agency: Zero Dark Thirty (Kathryn Bigelow’s film about the decade-long hunt for Osama bin Laden) and Argo (Ben Affleck’s film about the freeing of six hostages sheltered by the Canadian embassy in Iran). Both directors have been effusive in their praise for the bravery and dedication of the agency. The third sighting is the hit TV show Homeland, starring Claire Danes as a bipolar CIA agent, fighting al-Qaeda with her brilliant intuitions.

All of these productions have had CIA assistance creating their scripts (in the case of Zero Dark Thirty, controversially so). And the stories have a common thread: They tell tales of flawed, emotionally intuitive human beings, who are sometimes insubordinate to their cautious, by-the-books overseers because they care so much about American lives.

The soft-propaganda program, marching in lockstep with a gunfight against terrorism, has changed our perception of the agency. A new stereotype has emerged: The CIA is neither an idiot nor a sinister killer, and its agents are no longer thin-lipped Machiavellian spooks, pulling the strings of international intrigue. They are struggling and intuitive men and women, making the personal sacrifices to fight the war on the shape-shifting monster called terrorism.

The typically reticent CIA showed up relatively late to the Hollywood party, in the 1990s. The Federal Bureau of Investigation had been managing its image in popular media since the 1930s (1936’s G-Men, and the TV series The F.B.I.) , and the Department of Defence started Hollywood outreach in 1947, with the Pentagon offering support to such rah-rah films as Patton, Top Gun and Pearl Harbor.

But the post-Cold War period was a tough time for the CIA, which was undergoing downsizing, criticism from Congress and questions about its competency. Hollywood had not been traditional ally. Films from Three Days of the Condor (1975) to JFK (1991) typically showed the agency as either sinister, incompetent or both. Professor Tricia Jenkins, author of The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television (2012), categorized the negative stereotypes into three categories, “rogues, assassins and buffoons.”

In 1996, the CIA appointed its first Hollywood liaison officer, Chase Brandon (a first cousin to Tommy Lee Jones), to turn that image around. What could the agency offer? Not tanks and fighter jets like the Pentagon. But they could provide script advice, access to real spies, story ideas and an aura of authenticity. The agency started consulting on movies such as Enemy of the State (1998), The Sum of All Fears (2002) and The Recruit (2003) and television shows such as The Agency, Alias and 24 (in the fall of 2001, coincident with the 9/11 attacks).

The movie-friendly approach worked. Even in the wake of intelligence failures of 9/11 and the weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, the controversies over renditions and waterboarding, the agency’s representation on film and television has generally been more positive.

The CIA does not have final say over the final film, but the agency won’t help filmmakers if it finds a script unflattering, as in the cases of Spy Game (2001) or The Bourne Identity (2002). The benefits aren’t just about sending a message of competence, ingenuity and intimidating technology (“Terrorists watch TV, too,” Brandon told one producer). TV shows and movies are also regarded as recruitment tools, especially as the agency, which was criticized in the 9/11 Commission Report for a lack of diversity, reaches out to women and minorities: Jennifer Garner, star of Alias, and later Ben Affleck’s wife, did a recruitment video for the agency in 2004, which was posted on the CIA website and used at college employment fairs.

Of course, not all spy movies are officially approved. Retired CIA agents are also consulted on movies that cast the agency in a bad light, such as 2005’s Syriana, based on former agent Robert Baer’s memoir, See No Evil. Another retired agent, Milton Bearden, was a key player in The Good Shepherd, an unflattering history of the agency from its inception to the failure of the Bay of Pigs.

The agency doesn’t seem to hold grudges, or miss a PR opportunity. George Clooney, who produced and starred in Syriana, also directed Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002), based on the memoir of Gong Show host Chuck Barris, who claimed in his memoir that he was an assassin for the CIA. Clooney also starred in The Men Who Stare At Goats (2009), directed by his friend and producing partner, Grant Heslov, about the intelligence community’s ridiculous mind-control experiments. Both Clooney and Heslov are in line to win best picture Oscars as producers on Argo, which was given CIA co-operation and access to shoot at the agency’s Langley, Va., headquarters.

In The Recruit, Al Pacino tells a young apprentice that the public knows only the CIA’s failures, not its successes, but that has changed. Credit the agency with one of the greatest successful stealth missions ever perpetuated on the moviegoing public: It has made the CIA seem human.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/the-cias-image-in-films-has-never-been-shinier/article8935790/