December 7, 2010 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

John Lennon: Bull in Search of a China Shop

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

ALSO SEE: “Case Closed: The CIA Murder of John Lennon” – “On John Lennon’s Murder: Don’t Softsoap Me – Gimme Some Truth”

Giles Harvey NY Review of Books | November 30, 2010

When the Beatles called on Elvis at his rented Bel Air mansion in August 1965, the odds of a pleasant evening were always going to be long. Whereas the Fab Four, with five number one albums behind them, were currently basking in the high noon of their creative prime, Elvis had spent the past half-decade squandering his prodigious talents on awful movies and now, at only thirty, looked to be in permanent eclipse. And so, having taken a seat beside a sun-bronzed Elvis on the sofa—where, like any other night, he was simultaneously watching TV with the sound off and listening to music—John, Paul, George, and Ringo suddenly found themselves with nothing to say. “If you guys are just gonna sit there and stare at me,” said Presley at last, “I’m goin’ to bed…I didn’t mean for this to be like the subjects calling on the King.”

The evening seemed to turn a corner, though, when Elvis proposed a jam session and summoned the guitars. “This beats talking, doesn’t it?” said John Lennon, once the music was underway and it seemed as though they would get along after all. Later, however, Lennon began to press Elvis on why he’d abandoned rock ’n’ roll for Hollywood. The star of Tickle Me and Kissin’ Cousins bragged defensively: “I’m making movies at a million bucks a time and one of ’em—I won’t say which one—took only fifteen days to complete.” “Well, we’ve got an hour to spare now,” replied Lennon, unable to help himself. “Let’s make an epic together.” Elvis did not take the jibe well and things apparently devolved from there. According to the journalist Chris Hutchins, who was present at the meeting, when the Beatles finally left at around 2 a.m., Lennon is reported to have said to his host in the Inspector Clouseau accent he’d been slipping in and out of all evening: “Sanks for ze music, Elvis. Long live ze King!” The two rock ’n’ roll Olympians would never meet again. As everyone in Christendom is surely aware, we are currently in the thick of Lennon anniversary season: October 9 would have been his seventieth birthday and on December 8 it will be thirty years since he was murdered outside his home in the Dakota on Central Park West. But this particular Lennon—a kind of Shakespearean fool who relished taunting the King over his abject decline—is largely missing from the recent rash of hagiography, which gives us Lennon the incorrigible teenage rebel, Lennon the ardent peace activist, Lennon the contented family man, but not much of Lennon the unappeasable misanthrope, the man who in “Yer Blues,” from The White Album (1968), takes a running kick at the universe itself. Lennon was a spiky and unpredictable character, but we can be fairly sure he would have viewed the latest array of dewy-eyed commemorabilia with a mixture of impatience and contempt. His impulse was to desecrate idols, not prostrate himself before them. Nowhere Boy, a young-Lennon biopic directed by the British photographer and conceptual artist Sam Taylor-Wood, has a good go at shining a light into the dark places of Lennon’s soul, but is ultimately undone by its determination to make him likable. A compendium of facile ironies, the film presents us by turns with an array of soppy-stern oldsters telling the wayward young Lennon (played by Aaron Johnson) that he will never amount to anything; an old girlfriend calling Lennon “a loser” moments after he’s been denied access to the Cavern Club (where the Beatles would soon be discovered by their future manager, Brian Epstein); Lennon cursing God for not making him Elvis, and swearing he’ll one day get even (with God, that is, not the King). All this is interspersed with melodramatic flashbacks to the day when a five-year old John was forced to choose between his emotionally unstable mother and largely absentee father (a merchant seaman who was then about to leave England permanently for New Zealand). The result is a tedious game of psychological connect-the-dots, as the young singer-songwriter’s artistic fire and drive are shown to be a direct consequence of his troubled past. And while the film certainly shows Lennon getting into lots of trouble—riding around Liverpool on top of a double-decker bus, bunking off and getting suspended from school—it tends to side with him all too snugly. When he throws the rattle out of the pram at his mother’s wake (she was hit by a car in 1958) and punches a band mate before storming off, he is allowed to atone almost immediately, as he returns and tearfully wails, “I’m a shit! I’m a shit!” Somehow the Lennon of Nowhere Boy just isn’t nasty enough. However submerged they may have been at the start of the Beatles’ career, nastiness, mischief, and a penchant for misrule were always the main ingredients of Lennon’s genius. Brian Epstein, their upper-middle class, RADA-trained manager, took the foul-mouthed, sweat-drenched, leather-clad foursome he heard singing in the Cavern Club in 1961, cleaned them up a little (suits, ties, synchronized bows), and set them on their way, but the chaotic and irreverent vitality at the band’s core was never that far from the glossier surface. “For our last number, I’d like to ask your help,” Lennon said in a celebrated moment from the 1963 Royal Variety Performance to an audience that included Queen Elizabeth and the Queen Mother. “Would the people in the cheaper seats clap your hands. And the rest of you, if you’ll just rattle your jewelry.” It is Lennon’s simmering mania and anguish that make the early albums so thrilling. Listen to his raucous howl on the band’s psychotic version of “Money (That’s What I Want)” from With The Beatles (1963), or the way in which the tame, almost mincing verse of “I’m a Loser” (from 1964’s Beatles for Sale) erupts into the startlingly savage chorus. After Revolver (1966), aided by vast quantities of LSD, this mania and anguish came to a boil and Lennon wrote his greatest songs—“A Day in the Life,”* “Strawberry Fields Forever,” “I Am the Walrus,” “All You Need Is Love,” “I’m So Tired,” “Yer Blues,” “Happiness Is a Warm Gun,” “Don’t Let Me Down.” For someone like myself, born several years after Lennon’s murder, it is difficult to believe there was a time when these songs didn’t exist: they seem like a part of nature. The Beatles “got there first,” Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys said after first hearing “Strawberry Fields Forever” on his car radio, an experience that is reported to have led to his abandoning the legendary Pet Sounds follow up, Smile. One of the other glories of late-era Beatles is the gleeful manner with which Lennon goes about vandalizing the chipperness of various McCartney tracks. To the chorus of McCartney’s “Getting Better”—“It’s getting better all the time”—Lennon adds the dementedly high-pitched and utterly characteristic backing vocal, “It can’t get no worse.” On the jolly “Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da” (which Lennon denounced as “Paul’s granny shit”) he contributes a lot of sinister and derisive laughter and at 2:34, after McCartney sings the line “Molly lets the children lend a hand,” can be heard to querulously say “Foot!” The conventional Lennon NYC (directed by Michael Epstein) is not much better than Nowhere Boy. A documentary about the post-Beatles years Lennon spent in New York from 1971 until his death in 1980 (as well as the so-called Lost Weekend he spent in L.A. in 1973), the film gives us the usual splicing-together of archival footage and wizened talking heads, none of whom say anything remotely unexpected. Mostly they praise his seventies’ solo albums for being personal (“He projected himself, he projected his guts,” etc.), which was in fact one of their greatest limitations. “Mother” (from the 1970 John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band), written under the influence of primal scream therapy (“Mother, you had me but I never had you”) is always a chore, never a pleasure to listen to: the screaming at the end, however rebarbative, feels put on and perfunctory compared to the spontaneous howls and yelps one hears throughout the Beatles’ catalogue. Without McCartney, Epstein, or his own earlier glossy public image to chafe against and subvert, Lennon was like a bull in search of a china shop. The one great thing he did find to oppose was the Vietnam War. This, however, brought a fatal sloganeering quality to the music (Lennon NYC contains a highly irritating concert performance of “Give Peace a Chance,” in which Lennon and Yoko tunelessly shout the chorus at their audience through a megaphone). His anti-war activism also lead to years of FBI surveillance and efforts by the Nixon Administration to have him deported. One of Lennon NYC’s most memorable moments comes when Lennon emerges from a New York courthouse in 1975 having finally been granted his green card. Asked by the press if he bears a grudge against Nixon & co. for the shoddy treatment he’d received, he smiles and, without missing a beat, says in classic Lennon fashion, “Time wounds all heels.” * Though of course the interpolated bridge (“Woke up, got out of bed,” etc.) is McCartney’s. http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2010/nov/30/john-lennon-nyc-nowhere-boy/

Also see: “Hugo Boss Acknowledges Link to Nazi Regime,” NY Times, August 15, 1997

World’s best-known brands associates of fascism? (Excerpt)

Igor Bukker
Pravda | November 23, 2010

… In 2006, Austrian magazine Profil produced a sensation when it claimed that the world-known clothing brand Hugo Boss desecrated its reputation during World War II. It was said that the company was making clothes for both Wehrmacht and SS officers. The International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg recognized SS as a criminal organization.

Moreover, the article in the magazine said that Hugo Boss used the work of concentration camp prisoners. Hugo Boss’s son Siegfried said a year later that his father was a member of the Nazi party.

Hugo Boss opened his tailor shop in 1923, at the height of the economic crisis. Before 1931, the shop was hardly bringing any profit. The situation changed after Boss joined the Nazi party. Two years later, Boss received a state order for making military coats for SS officers, Wehrmacht military men and members of Hitler-Jugend youth organization. The military clothes designed by Hugo Boss are still considered the best uniforms in history. After the war, Boss was fined 80,000 Reichsmarks as an associate of the Nazi regime. In 1948, Hugo Boss retired and handed his business over to his heirs.

Death camps prisoners worked for other German enterprises too, such as Krupp, Siemens, Bayer, Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen, Porsche. They even worked for Ford. One shall assume that the products of these companies shall be boycotted.

It is worthy of note that black SS uniforms were designed by 34-year-old heraldry specialist, Professor Dr. Karl Diebitsch and his assistant Walter Heck. The latter designed the SS cold steel arms and the double Sig Rune. Hugo Boss’s studio was making clothes for top SS officials and Luftwaffe.

Diebitsch was inspired with the uniforms worn by Prussian hussars (Totenkopfhusaren), whose mirlitones were decorated with Totenkopf emblems – “dead head”. The combination of black and white was a tribute paid to heraldic colors of the Kingdom of Prussia.

Black military coats and service caps for SS officers were introduced on July 7, 1932. After 1939, gray uniforms were introduced instead. All-black uniforms were canceled in Germany in 1944.

Igor Bukker
Pravda.Ru

“… Last night’s judgment authoritatively places Berlusconi at one end of a chain that leads through Dell’Utri to Cosa Nostra. The prime minister has in the past vehemently denied any connivance with organised crime. …”

Judges say Italian prime minister handed over ‘enormous sums of money’ to Cosa Nostra for protection

By John Hooper
The Guardian | November 20, 2010

Silvio Berlusconi expanded his Italian TV network by paying the mafia for protection and the installation of relay stations in Sicily, judges say. Photograph: Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

The man who spearheaded Silvio Berlusconi’s entry into politics was also an intermediary between the media magnate and the Sicilian mafia, judges in Palermo ruled last night.

In a lengthy written judgment on one of the Italian prime minister’s closest associates, the judges said that before entering politics Berlusconi paid “enormous sums of money” to Cosa Nostra for protection and later handed over funds to safeguard his network’s relay stations on Sicily.

Their conclusions dealt a stunning blow to Berlusconi, and came as reports surfaced that one of his ministers was planning to step down. Maria Carfagna, the 34-year-old former topless model turned equal opportunities minister, failed to deny the reports after they began to circulate.

The judges of the appeal court in Palermo were giving the reasons behind a decision in June to partially uphold the conviction of Marcello Dell’Utri, a senator and the man who in 1993 organised Berlusconi’s first party, Forza Italia (Come on Italy!).

In a 641-page document, the three judges wrote that, until the year before, Dell’Utri had also been a “specific channel of communication” between the tycoon and Cosa Nostra. They said his role was one of mediation between the mob and Berlusconi. Initial extracts from the document did not make clear whether they considered the future PM to have been a victim or a beneficiary of his relationship with the mafia.

But certain passages appeared to imply that he was both. The judges accepted as credible the account of a mafioso turned state’s evidence who testified that Berlusconi had received three Cosa Nostra godfathers at his office in Milan in 1975 to arrange for protection for himself and his family after receiving threats.

But, they added, “between the end of the 1970s and the beginning of the 1980s … sums of money began to reach the organised crime syndicate from Fininvest [the firm at the heart of Berlusconi’s business empire]” that were no longer just for protection “but also for the installation of TV relay stations on Sicily” at a time when Berlusconi was expanding his TV network.

A spokesman for the prime minister’s party described Dell’Utri’s conviction as unjust, but did not comment on its implications for Berlusconi. Laura Garavini, chief representative on the parliamentary anti-mafia commission of Italy’s biggest opposition group, the Democratic party, said the judgment offered confirmation of “the very dark shadows hanging over the construction of Silvio Berlusconi’s vast business empire, which was decisive too for the subsequent birth of Forza Italia.”

On 29 June , judges in Palermo reduced Dell’Utri’s sentence from nine to seven years and upheld his conviction for associating with the mafia – but only prior to 1992. That drew the sting from claims by former mobsters and others that Forza Italia had, in effect, been sponsored by the mafia.

Last night’s judgment authoritatively places Berlusconi at one end of a chain that leads through Dell’Utri to Cosa Nostra. The prime minister has in the past vehemently denied any connivance with organised crime. His supporters have argued that the allegations against him are motivated by mafia fury over the progress made by his government in combating organised crime. This week, police arrested prominent Camorra mobster Antonio Iovine in Casal di Principe near Naples. Iovine was the acting boss of a gang that figures prominently in Roberto Saviano’s global best-seller, Gomorrah.

Berlusconi’s spokesman said last night he had no comment over the ruling.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/20/silvio-berlusconi-ally-sicilian-mafia

For 65 years Bernhard Frank hid chilling past, including signing first order instructing Jewish genocide and close ties with Hitler, Himmler. Personal interviews with US Jew disguised as Neo-Nazi reveal dark secrets leading to upcoming lawsuit

By Eldad Beck
ynetnews.com | December 7, 2010

BERLIN – He was a senior assistant to SS and Gestapo Commander Heinrich Himmler, and befriended Adolf Hitler as well. He was responsible for signing the first order of the Reich instructing the mass murder of hundreds of thousands of Jews, later turning into the Nazi systematic extermination machine.

But for the past 65 years since the end of World War II, Dr. Bernhard Frank managed to hide his direct involvement with the Jewish genocide, walking around freely in Germany and never being prosecuted for his actions.

Now, at the age of 97, he is being exposed for the first time by an American Jew who pretended to be a neo-Nazi.

In the upcoming days a lawsuit is expected to be filed in the United States against Frank, the most senior Nazi criminal still alive today. The suit, which will probably also call for his extradition, will be filed on behalf of US citizens whose families were murdered during WWII as part of the cruel order signed by Frank. The suit claims he is responsible for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.

One of the prosecutors, a young 43-year-old American Jew by the name of Mark Gould, was actually the one who managed to expose Frank’s past. In a special Yedioth Ahronoth interview Gould talks about how he was able to connect the puzzle pieces and uncover the chilling past of an old Nazi criminal.

Secrets Uncovered

Gould took advantage of his Aryan looks – tall, blond hair, blue eyes – in order to get close to the Nazi officer. He impersonated a neo-Nazi and met with Frank over the years, interviewing him for long hours at a time, sometimes documenting the meeting on video. This material is likely to serve as legal evidence against Frank during the trial.

Over time, the two developed a trusting relationship, and Frank began to confess to Gould about his SS past.

Frank was responsible for the Nazi language code used by the SS to disguise the ‘special treatment’ given to Jews during the German occupation of USSR territories. He was also one of the senior officers in charge of consolidating and distributing the racist Nazi ideology.

Frank was selected by Himmler to serve in a special commando unit responsible for SS operations in occupied USSR territories in the summer of 1941. As part of his new position, as Himmler’s senior assistant, he was personally responsible for signing the July 28 1941 order called “Comando Stadt Order”. This was the first actual SS order instructing to kill hundreds of thousands of Jews, including women and children, preceding the Commissar order. It was the first stage of the massive Jewish extermination process.

At the time, Frank was instructed by Himmler to keep an SS war journal, gathering all reports of SS activities, including the Jewish genocide.

Hiter’s personal order

In 1943, Frank was appointed head of security at the SS base of Obersalzberg, the beloved mountain residence of Adolf Hitler located in southern Germany.

It was then that Frank was given a personal order by Hitler to kill Hermann Göring, a high ranking Nazi officer who announced his intention to take over the German leadership, due to Russia’s closure of Hitler’s bunker in Berlin. Frank refused to go through with it, but he did arrest him for treason.

Frank later signed Obersalzberg’s surrender letter to the US, hoping he could prevent its complete destruction.

Over the years he wrote books about his service in the SS and gave television interviews, but always made sure to hide any information regarding his SS service under Himmler.

Loved by Himmler

During one of his long interviews with Gould, Frank said he and Himmler had a great relationship and that the latter loved him very much. Frank went on to say that the SS commander was a “good man.”

Frank told Gould that when he was young he had Jewish friends, but that the political events at the time forced him to cut ties with them. He claimed that the Jews played a major role in German oppression and “dug their own graves.” Frank added that the war was the outcome of decision made by governments, and the Nazis were only fulfilling their duties.

When the relationship between the two grew stronger, Gould confronted Frank with the extermination orders he had signed. After short hesitation, Frank admitted the signature on the documents was, in fact, his, but claimed he had only approved the linguistic content.

“He defended himself, saying the order was necessary, because Jews in those areas were involved in guerilla warfare against Germans,” said Gould in an exclusive Yedioth Ahronoth interview. “In retrospect, we are talking about the first act of genocide by the SS. It was before the trains began making their way to extermination camps. It was also the first actual mass murder test run. The command wanted to see if SS soldiers would murder Jewish citizens, including women, children and elders. Frank was responsible for wording the orders in such a way that the troops on location, especially those who had undergone ideological training, could understand what do to. It was written in the spirit of Reinhard Heydrich (a high-ranking SS official, the first to be in charge of the ‘Final Solution’ operation).”

A rifle by his side

“Frank justified the orders, claiming they were given during the war, when there were a lot of partisan Jews, outlaws and robbers,” added Gould. “When asked if the women and children murdered were also partisans and robbers, he shrugged his shoulders and didn’t respond. I caught him lying a lot during the interviews. He admitted to some of the lies. Eventually he let me do anything I wanted with the materials. A rifle was by his side during many interviews, so he could have shot me if he wanted to. When I confronted him I feared what he might do to me or to himself. But my impression was that Frank wished to receive recognition for all the things he had done while serving in the SS. He hid it for so many decades. He was very proud of his actions and the fact that I was able to expose what he had done made him appreciate me. He gave me all the material which could convict him, including private journals, love letters and other documents he had written.”

Gould arrived at Frank’s house in Frankfurt last weekend to personally deliver the lawsuit against him. Frank’s spouse attacked Gould and he needed to get medical attention at a nearby hospital.

“A civil lawsuit filed against Frank in the US will allow us to make sure a man doesn’t get away with crimes he had committed and not dodge the punishment,” said the prosecutor, Attorney Nitzana Darshan-Leitner. “Even after his death, the lawsuit will continue for his inheritance and his family will have to pay the price.”

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3995490,00.html