September 24, 2010 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

VA Details Changes for Agent Orange Claims

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

By Ed O’Keefe
Washington Post | August 30, 2010

More than 150,000 Vietnam War veterans may apply for benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs in the next 18 months thanks to new regulations making it easier to compensate for health problems caused by exposure to the Vietnam-era defoliant Agent Orange.

The changes could result in payouts of about $42 billion in the next decade. But they could still face resistance from lawmakers concerned about the VA paying out claims for ailments that are common in elderly Americans anyway, despite military service.

Under the new regulations set for publication in Tuesday’s Federal Register, VA will presume that veterans who served in Vietnam between Jan. 9, 1962, and May 7, 1975 were exposed to Agent Orange and will add three medical conditions — hairy cell leukemia, Parkinson’s disease and ischemic heart disease — to its list of disabilities presumed to have a connection to exposure to the herbicide.

VA also plans to review about 90,000 previously denied claims from veterans who sought benefits for Agent Orange-related health problems.

The changes could result in about $13 billion in benefits payments in the next year, VA Acting Undersecretary for Benefits Michael Walcoff said Saturday.

“There will be articles out there written by writers — we’re working with a writer right now who’s very negative about this — very negative about the fact it’s going to cost so much money,” Walcoff told attendees at the American Legion National Convention. “Very negative about the fact that anybody who was in Vietnam qualifies for this. That’s the kind of thinking that’s out there.”

“The fact is we’re obeying the law,” Walcoff told attendees. “The law says that anybody who was in country is entitled to the presumptions. Besides that, I believe that what we’re doing is the right thing to do. It’s what [VA Secretary Eric K. Shinseki] wants to do.”

Rick Weidman, director of government relations for Vietnam Veterans of America, also defended the high costs, saying they should be considered in the same context of the ongoing wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

“We would make the point that many, many times the number of troops originally estimated have [traumatic brain injury] coming out of Iraq and Afghanistan,” Weidman said. “Should we not then award it because it’s too many people.? It’s the same argument – an environmental wound is the same as a blast wound.”

Congress included $13.4 billion for Agent Orange-related benefits in this year’s $58 billion supplemental spending bill, but Sen. James Webb (D-Va.), a Vietnam veteran, has said that adding ischemic heart disease to VA’s list of approved diseases could result in the department paying veterans for a disease they might have contracted anyway as they aged.

“I take a back seat to no one in my concern for our veterans. I have spent my entire adult life one way or the other involved in veterans law,” Webb said in May. “But I do think we need to have practical, proper procedures and I do believe that the executive branch…needs to be held to an accountable standard.”

Webb sits on the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, which is scheduled to hold a hearing on the new regulations on Sept. 23.

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/federal-eye/2010/08/va_announces_changes_for_agent.html

By Ryan Harvey
t r u t h o u t | 24 September 2010

Protesters rally for Bradley Manning. (Photo: mar is sea Y / Flickr)

At a rally Sunday, September 18, 2010, outside of the gates of Quantico Marine Base in Virginia, Iraq veterans spoke on behalf of a soldier imprisoned inside, Pfc. Bradley Manning.

Manning has been held in solitary confinement at Quantico for almost three months now, accused of being the source of the “Collateral Murder” video which was released in April by the online whistleblower web site WikiLeaks. The video shows US forces firing 30 mm cannons from helicopter gunships into a crowd in Baghdad, killing over a dozen Iraqis, including two Reuters journalists, and seriously wounding two children.

The government has intimated that Manning may also be considered the source of the “Afghan War Diaries,” a series of almost 100,000 documents pertaining to the Afghan war published in July by WikiLeaks, which all together constitute the largest leak in military history.

A former soldier from the ground unit that responded to the helicopter shooting seen in the now-infamous video described the incident as a typical moment in his 2007 deployment to Baghdad as part of the Surge. “It was by no means abnormal,” said the former soldier, Josh Stieber, who served 14 months in the New Baghdad neighborhood.

In a previous interview with me, Stieber and two other soldiers from his unit, Bravo Company 2-16, detailed the paradox of attempting to “win hearts and minds” while systematically abusing people. “I think it illustrates why we shouldn’t put soldiers in that situation” he said of the video.

“That’s what the war looks like,” he told the crowd Sunday, while explaining that those who leak such information to the public are doing a service to the country. “It’s important in order to even have a conversation on [these wars] where soldiers are supposedly fighting on behalf of the American public,” he added, “for the American public to realize what kinds of situations soldiers are being put into.”

Matt Southworth, a former soldier who now works for the Friends Committee on National Legislation, a Quaker lobby on Capitol Hill, spoke to the crowd as well and echoed Stieber’s experience. “So many things were commonplace,” he said of his 2004 deployment to Mosul and Tal Afar in northern Iraq. “Abuses of Iraqi detainees, unjustified raids, unjustified trashing of peoples homes,” he says. “It was hard to qualify what was ‘right’ and what was ‘wrong.'”

Like Stieber, Southworth has a specific interest in the case of Manning. As an intelligence analyst with the Army’s 2nd ID, Third Brigade, 1-14 Cavalry Squadron, he shared the same Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) as Private First Class Manning, which means they had roughly the same job. And as a former intelligence analyst, he believes that whoever leaked the “Collateral Murder” video and the “Afghan War Diaries” was justified in doing so. “Exposing the things that happen, I think, is actually crucial,” he tells me. “It’s imperative that we really think about these things.”

Jacob George, a three-tour Afghanistan veteran who served with the Army Special Operations Command’s 528th Special Operations Support Battalion, has been publicly supporting Manning as well. He too calls the accused a hero, if indeed he is the WikiLeaks source. “He’s doing this country a favor,” he states bluntly. “I think whistle blowing is the only way to challenge the narrative of war that we have right now. The media and our government, which closely controls the media, doesn’t allow transparency and cultivating transparency is the thing that [the WikiLeaks source] did. It is a heroic act.”

To shine light on the fact that these leaks show only relatively small portions of two very long wars, these veterans tell me about some similar things they witnessed that haven’t been brought to the public’s attention by a whistleblower. Southworth describes a car “full of women and children” driving past his convoy too fast. “Some of the soldiers at the back of the convoy opened fire and killed everybody in the car,” he says, “because they got too close.”

This he says, like the helicopter shooting documented in the “Collateral Murder” video, was “Standard Operating Procedure (SOP).” The soldiers in the WikiLeaks video “followed SOP; they requested permission to engage and they did ‘everything right’ by the military’s standard,” he confirms.

George recalls a gruesome story of what he thought was an isolated incident – that is, until a similar story of soldiers organizing “Kill Squads” and cutting off fingers of victims in Afghanistan came to light earlier this month. In the summer of 2002, George was stationed at a firebase in southern Afghanistan. “One day, there was a visit from some British Special Air Service (SAS) guys, and they were in their normal tactical vehicle,” he says. “As they were approaching the base, I could see something dangling on their side view mirror.” When he realized what it was, George was disgusted. “It was a bunch of ears hanging off of a necklace,” he says. “There’s no telling how many ears were on that thing.”

In light of recent stories suggesting similar incidents among US soldiers in Afghanistan, he concludes that things like this “probably happened way more over there than I want to know about.”

In Afghanistan, George also witnessed a scene very similar to the one depicted in the “Collateral Murder” video. After receiving intel that possible insurgents had entered a nearby building, Special Forces soldiers approached. “No one knew who was in the building,” he says, describing how one or two insurgents could have just run into a building housing civilians as well. “They caught some small arms fire from the building as they approached.” George says, “and the end result was that a bunch of Apaches came and just leveled it.” He does not know how many people were killed in the attack because “all we could find was arms and legs.” The limbs were loaded into two body bags and George had to carry them back to Bagram Air Base “so they could figure out who we just killed.”

Southworth says it wasn’t just the killing, but the daily abuse and degradation that he witnessed and participated in that really made him question the war. “The thing that affected me most,” Southworth tells me, “was detaining Iraqis and holding them for hours, sometimes days.” He says he and his fellow soldiers would “break down doors at three in the morning and we’d separate all the men and women. We’d take all the men of fighting age and put f–king sacks on their heads and zip cuff ’em.” As they transferred these young men to detainment centers, “they would sometimes urinate or defecate on themselves and we’d have to hose them off,” he says.

He describes a system of mass detainment of “suspected insurgents,” mostly young men who were picked up during random house searches simply for being of “fighting age.” He explains that these raids were often based on faulty intelligence and the detainees, after going through the Army’s “Observation Areas,” where they would often sit in plexiglass boxes for days – sometimes with bags over their heads – would usually just be released without charges.

“They were presumed guilty until decided innocent by some counter-intel guy who was interrogating them through a translator,” Southworth says. “He didn’t even speak Arabic … This guy gets to decide the fate of these people and who knows where they go. They could have ended up at Abu Ghraib or Guantanamo, or be extraordinary renditioned somewhere around the world.”

These are the wars that Southworth, Stieber and George want the American people and the world to see, because it was the daily reality for them as they put their lives at risk on the frontlines. And they want the world and especially Americans, to put themselves in the shoes of the occupied.

“I don’t think it takes a whole lot of imagination to think about what would happen if something similar were to happen in our own neighborhoods,” Stieber told the crowd. “We probably wouldn’t be very sympathetic to the army that came in and did that.” George frames it similarly, talking about the “Collateral Murder” shootings. “If someone were to do that on the streets in our own country,” he suggests, “how would they be treated?”

Who Is Really Putting Lives at Risk?

Though some military officials and political leaders have accused WikiLeaks of putting US troops and Afghan allies in harm’s way by leaking the “Afghan War Diaries” documents, these former soldiers do not see this as an honest assessment.

“First and foremost” says Southworth, “we have to point out that what endangers the lives of these soldiers most is the government that sends them to war … There is a legitimate concern about keeping people safe, but I don’t think these documents make anyone less safe than the fact that they’re deployed in the first place into senseless places, fighting just to fight.”

George does not see the “Afghan War Diaries” as exposing much more than what the average Afghan or US troop already knows, but rather, he sees it mainly as an intelligence report for the American public. “The one thing that probably was alarming [in the leaked documents] was that in almost every military operation that I looked through, there were civilian causalities,” he says. “One here, two there, sometimes five to ten … when five to ten people are killed daily over the course of a few weeks, that adds up.”

Stieber says all these leaked documents are “an indicator of a much broader situation,” and he believes that the transparency made through these leaks is an important factor in the public getting a real understanding of that broader situation “so people can make informed decisions about what goes on on the ground.” When that information is available, he says, “the official narrative of what’s going on with these wars shows itself to not be completely accurate.” George echoes this, speaking of accused WikiLeaks source Manning. “We have to re-write the narrative of this man’s deeds.”

“I really hope [we] spend more time thinking about the content of the documents rather than how whomever leaked them should be punished,” Southworth says. “We have orders as soldiers to disobey unlawful orders. And [in these wars] it’s Standard Operating Procedure to do things that are against the Geneva Conventions.”

“I think as long as we’re doing things that are unjust and unlawful,” he concludes, “someone should expose those. And I don’t think someone exposing those is a crime. I think it’s something that can be viewed as the right thing to do.”

http://www.truth-out.org/veterans-defend-accused-wikileaks-source-bradley-manning63555

GOP will try to get own candidate off NY ballot

By JIM FITZGERALD (AP) – 2 days ago

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Republicans will try to remove their own candidate from the ballot in a suburban New York congressional race because he wrote an article warning against racial mingling, a party official said Wednesday.

Jim Russell, 56, a perennial GOP candidate known for his strong opposition to immigration, wrote in 2001 that parents should teach their children “an acceptance of appropriate ethnic boundaries for socialization and for marriage.”

Several times, he cited the eugenics movement, the effort to improve the human race by controlling heredity. In a long recitation of the accomplishments of Western civilization, he also quoted T.S. Eliot as writing, “reasons of race and culture combine to make any large number of freethinking Jews undesirable.”

The article appeared in the Occidental Quarterly, titled “The Western Contribution to World History.” It was first reported on the Politico website.

Westchester County Republican Chairman Doug Colety called Russell’s article “racist.”

“We’ve denounced his campaign,” Colety said. “We’re not supporting him. We’ve withdrawn funds, volunteers, all resources. This is not the way Republicans think.”

He added: “This is the party of Lincoln.”

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gKeyakgtcKzywmTSitgOnKhKu2PQD9ID87500

Also see:

 GOP embraces Carl Paladino, but rejects Jim Russell?

Jim Russell, the Republican candidate in the New York’s 18th House district is under fire from his own party for what they describe (accurately

North Country Public Radio (blog) – Brian Mann – ‎Sep 23, 2010‎

Jim Russell: Right Winger or Certifiable Nazi?

Brian C. Thomas 
Chicago Now | September 22, 2010

… Jim Russell is running for Congress in New York’s 18th District, which is an area just north of New York City with parts of the district bordering on Connecticut. Russell, who is challenging longtime Democratic incumbent, Rita Lowery, has been endorsed by the state’s Republican party and the state Conservative party.

In 2001, he wrote an essay titled “The Western Contribution to World History”, which was published in the Occidental Quarterly, Russell rallied like-minded people against interracial relationships and school integration. In that essay, he praised anti-Semitic theories. He praised and touted studies linking race to IQ. He has said parents need to teach their children “appropriate ethnic boundaries” for marriage and socializing.

I hate to label anyone a Nazi- but this guy is pretty close.  Here are portions of his 2001 essay, you decide:

(T.S.) Eliot described some conditions for an optimal society: ‘The population should be homogeneous. . . . What is still more important is unity of religious background; and reasons of race and culture combine to make any large number of free-thinking Jews undesirable. There must be a proper balance between urban and rural, industrial and agricultural development. And a spirit of excessive tolerance is to be deprecated.’

Kevin MacDonald’s (pushed the theory that Jews practice “group-think” to outperform non-Jews) work on religion, and particularly Judaism, as a group evolutionary strategy, is essential for a thorough understanding of our current predicament.

                                                    *              *               *

Despite threats on his life, Arthur Jensen persevered in studying the relationship between IQ and race. In Canada, neither state-sponsored censorship nor private harassment has deterred J. Philippe Rushton’s inquiries into Race, Evolution and Behavior. The importance of applying eugenic measures in the West becomes evident from Richard Lynn’s recent work on Dysgenics and his just-released seminal work Eugenics: A Reassessment.

                                                  *               *               *

The sociobiological warfare that our youth is subjected to is likely to be even more diabolical since it appears to deliberately exploit a biological theory of sexual imprinting at the critical period of sexual maturity. Movies like this past year’s spate of miscegenationist titles, Save the Last Dance, Crazy / Beautiful and O, a parody of Othello, appear deliberately designed to exploit the critical period of sexual imprinting in their target audiences of white pre-adolescent girls and adolescent young women.

                                                *                 *               *

It has been demonstrated that finches raised by foster parents of a different species of finch will later exhibit a lifelong sexual attraction toward the alien species. One wonders how a child’s sexual imprinting mechanism is affected by forcible racial integration and near continual exposure to media stimuli promoting interracial contact. The most serious implication of human sexual imprinting for our genetic future is that it would establish the destructiveness of school integration, especially in the middle and high-school years. One can only wonder to what degree the advocates of school integration, such as former NAACP attorney Jack Greenberg, were conscious of this scientific concept. It also compounds the culpability of media moguls who deliberately popularize miscegenation in films directed toward adolescents and pre-adolescents. In the midst of this onslaught against our youth, parents need to be reminded that they have a natural obligation, as essential as providing food and shelter, to instill in their children an acceptance of appropriate ethnic boundaries for socialization and for marriage.

I presume when the state Republican party reads Russell’s 2001 essay, it will rethink its endorsement of Jim Russell. While our society allows the Jim Russells out there to speak and write his beliefs, the marketplace of ideas will hopefully find them ridiculous if not shameful. He should be allowed to run for office, but the fact that the state Republican party endorsed him (according to his website) is downright frightening.

http://www.chicagonow.com/blogs/your-doubting-thomas/2010/09/jim-russell-a-new-york-republican-running-congress-is-a-nazi-seriously.html

Also see:

GOP House Candidate Jim Russell: ‘Ghetto Culture’ Must Be Stopped

Death and Taxes – Andrew Belonsky – ‎Sep 21, 2010‎

Yes, like so many Western racists in the past, Russell’s argument rests on “protecting our girls.” In 1955, 14-year old Emmett Till was lynched for

By Alison Boggs

The Spokesman-Review | September 8, 2010

On Sept. 7, 2000, a Kootenai County jury rendered a $6.3 million verdict against the Aryan Nations and its leader, Richard Butler.

That action bankrupted the racist organization, severely diminishing its influence in North Idaho.

On Tuesday, 10 years later, civil rights leaders joined with leaders from Coeur d’Alene, Kootenai County, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe and law enforcement to celebrate the victory at the Kootenai County veterans’ plaza. The Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations unveiled a monument made of black marble to commemorate the day.

“What a great day this is. Ten years ago and more, we had people living in this community and in this area that were full of fear,” said Coeur d’Alene Mayor Sandi Bloem. “We had many people that lived outside of this community that wouldn’t come here because they were afraid. And today, because of the heroes standing here, we can celebrate the fact that we don’t live in fear and people come to this community from all over the world.

“Silence never did win any rights,” Bloem said. “Silence never did pick up and make us a better place. And silence certainly wouldn’t have done it 10 years ago.”

On July 1, 1998, Victoria Keenan and her son, Jason, were driving past the Aryan Nations compound near Hayden when they were attacked by the organization’s security guards after their car backfired. Bullets hit their car; they were driven off the road. The guards threatened to kill them if they reported the incident. When the Keenans contacted the task force, its attorney, Norm Gissel of Coeur d’Alene, recruited renowned human rights lawyer Morris Dees and the Southern Poverty Law Center to represent the Keenans in the civil trial.

Coeur d’Alene attorney Ken Howard also joined the legal team. On Tuesday, Howard said that for years, Butler and the Aryan Nations used their notoriety to “embarrass and define this beautiful North Idaho homeland of ours as a place inhospitable to all of those who were not of the white Christian race.” For years, he said, they held parades along Sherman Avenue, and followers of Butler acted out “hatred and intolerance” by engaging in bombings, shootings and murder, but none of the violent acts could be tied to Butler.

Butler survived in this community, Howard said, because people here believed in the constitutional protections of freedom of speech and religion, despite being “deeply troubled” by the reputation of hatred and intolerance brought upon the area.

“On Sept. 7, 2000, this community’s tolerance of Butler came to an end,” Howard said. “This verdict was, in part, directed to compensate the Keenans, but largely to punish Butler and his followers and to serve to deter similar conduct in the future.”

Following the jury’s civil verdict, Butler and the Aryan Nations declared bankruptcy in federal court. The Keenans were awarded the compound, which they sold to philanthropist and human rights activist Greg Carr. He destroyed the compound and turned it into a peace park, which he donated to the North Idaho College Foundation.

“What I love most about this victory is the way the local community handled it,” said Carr, also among Tuesday’s speakers. “You didn’t take away the free speech of the other side; you just made your own voices louder. And because your cause was just, you won the argument.”

The stone for the monument unveiled Tuesday was donated by Da Vinci Stone Design of Post Falls. Artist Julie Wood contributed her services designing and engraving the stone. The monument will be displayed permanently either at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library or at the North Idaho College library, following a decision by the task force’s board of directors.

Paul Mullet, the self-described national director of the Aryan Nations, contacted the media two weeks ago when he heard about the ceremony. He said that although he has moved to Ohio due to a family death, the Aryan Nations will never leave North Idaho.

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2010/sep/08/justice-was-served/

Was Italy’s President Cossiga “hateful” and “offensive,” too? Well, once, yes – but only because he once collaborated with the CIA’s jackals … and eventually regretted it deeply, went public with his “hate” of the Agency’s lethal Gladio machinations throughout Europe … but he never lost his conviction that the CIA engineered 9/11, however “offensive” a certain a two-faced, drone-hugging American president may find it … This is an excerpt. Full post: https://constantinereport.com#obit-1-italian-ex-president-anti-terrorist-francesco-cossiga-was-an-architect-of-the-gladio-terror-network-2-cossiga-publicly-blamed-911-on-the-cia-mossad

” … One of Cossiga’s most controversial statements concerned the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks … ‘all of the democratic circles of America and of Europe, especially those of the Italian center-left, now know well that the disastrous attack was planned and realized by the American CIA and Mossad with the help of the Zionist world in order to place the blame on Arabic countries and to persuade the Western powers to intervene in Iraq and Afghanistan. … “

President Cossiga Blamed 9/11 on the CIA & Mossad

Friends, foes comment on Cossiga’s death   

ROME, Aug. 18 (UPI) — In death, as in life, former Italian President Francesco Cossiga drew praise from supporters and derision from detractors, observers say. Outside Gemelli Hospital in Rome flags flew at half-staff for the former head of the Christian Democrat party who died at the age of 82 Tuesday, ANSA reported Wednesday. Messages left in the chapel memory book and around the hospital ranged from laudatory to vituperative. Italian President Giorgio Napolitano said he had come to make “a small homage to a great statesman.” Another wrote, “Ciao Presidente Picconatore” (Goodbye Pickaxe-Wielding President), a reference to the blows Cossiga’s attempted demolition of political institutions and the party system during the last years of his 1985-1992 presidency. Another citizen wrote, “A Killer Has Died,” on a poster that called Cossiga “a state criminal,” ANSA said. Cossiga said he didn’t want a state funeral. He will have a private burial in his northern Sardinian home town. One of Cossiga’s most controversial statements concerned the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks on the United States as reported in the Nov. 30, 2007, edition of Corriere della Sera in which he was quoted as saying, “all of the democratic circles of America and of Europe, especially those of the Italian center-left, now know well that the disastrous attack was planned and realized by the American CIA and Mossad with the help of the Zionist world in order to place the blame on Arabic countries and to persuade the Western powers to intervene in Iraq and Afghanistan.” http://www.polijam.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=20825:friends-foes-comment-on-cossigas-death&catid=54:world&Itemid=53 

 

“The laid-off workers were owed over $2 million dollars in severance pay, but it was not until significant pressure from college students and administrators mounted that Nike responded to the workers’ claims. … “

By Gregory Hess
Roosevelt Torch (Madison, Wis. student paper) | September 14, 2010

In a victory for student organizers at Roosevelt and across the country, apparel company Nike agreed on July 26 to pay $1.54 million to a group of Honduran factory workers who were displaced from their jobs when the factories they worked in were closed without warning.

According to the New York Times, several universities including the University of Wisconsin at Madison severed licensing agreements with Nike due to the issue, and a nationwide grassroots protest campaign was launched with the support of the United Students Against Sweatshops, a group which campaigns on behalf of paying living wage for workers creating University apparel.

Hugger and Vision Tex, two Nike sub-contractors, closed their plants in Honduras suddenly in January 2009, leaving nearly 2,000 workers unemployed.

The Workers Rights Consortium investigated the closing and concluded that, under Honduran law, the laid-off workers were owed over $2 million dollars in severance pay, but it was not until significant pressure from college students and administrators mounted that Nike responded to the workers’ claims.

The payment package, which Nike has labeled as a “worker relief fund,” also includes funds for training and placement assistance for the 1,800 workers who were left jobless after the closings.

As reported by the Cornell Daily Sun, CSAS President Alex Bores said that Nike’s actions constituted “the first time in history that an apparel corporation has taken responsibility for its subcontractors.”

Roosevelt University hosted two of the Honduran workers, Gina Cano and Lowlee Urquia, for a student discussion in April.

Students also collaborated with other area schools for a protest at Nike Town in Chicago.  The campaign, titled “Just Undo It,” also found support from the USAS.

Andrea Alexander, a Roosevelt student who was involved with the protest, said that news of the victory made her feel that “students across the country can unite.”

“When I read the email from the USAS and told the other people who were involved, it made me feel like students really can make a difference,” she said.

In March Roosevelt announced its intention to join the Workers Rights Consortium, an organization that monitors conditions in factories where college apparel is manufactured.

This affiliation would satisfy students’ concerns about workers’ rights, while also allowing Roosevelt to maintain a working relationship with Nike.

http://www.roosevelttorch.com/sections/news/nike-agrees-to-pay-honduran-workers-1.2328935