November 11, 2009 - The Constantine Report    
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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

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March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading
Image
March 5th 2020 12

Are you using the best credit card when ordering food for delivery?

The key to more success is to have a lot of pillows. Always remember in the jungle there’s a lot of they in there, after you will make it to paradise. Egg whites, turkey sausage, wheat toast, water.

Continue reading

Moonie Arnaud de Borchgrave Blames Ft. Hood Murders on 9/11 Truthers

This is a modified py-6 that occupies the entire horizontal space of its parent.

By Alex Constantine

If an award is given at the next media conclave for agenda-driven scapegoating, Moonie Arnaud de Borchgrave should win it hands down for this inventive masterpice of marginalization:

Commentary: Hasan’s Conspiracy Mentors
By ARNAUD DE BORCHGRAVE
Nov. 9, 2009

WASHINGTON, Nov. 9 (UPI) — … There are tens of thousands of Hasans all over the Western world — from Brussels to Berlin and from Burgos, Spain, to Birmingham, U.K. For them, Sept. 11, 2001, was a conspiracy cooked up by the CIA and Mossad, Israel’s external intelligence service. Even though al-Qaida’s Osama bin Laden and his No. 2 Ayman al-Zawahiri have both taken credit for Sept. 11, countless millions are convinced they had nothing to do with the attacks on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon.

Watch those Truthers – they’re PTSD’d, paranoid and will go postal at any moment!

“Tens of thousands of Hasans.” I’m not aware of any corollary linking mass murder to the belief that a missile struck the Pentagon, but de Borchgrave seems convinced that one exists. It comes about this way, and de Borchgrave discovered it by reading Hasan’s mind – a man who stares at goats?:

“[Hasan] had counseled scores of battle-shocked, wounded veterans — in his mind casualties of the Mossad-CIA conspiracy, now an article of faith among most Muslims.”

That one completely evades me. Who has reported that Hasan even believed in 9/11 “conspiracy theories?” Not even the lunatics at the Washington Times. It’s an immense assumption, but de Borchgrave runs with it. He makes a token effort to explain it, but inside his head, I think his aim is to program conservatives, and discredit anyone who questions the Bush regime’s explanation for 9/11. There is this manipulative comparison:

“The Sept. 11 conspiracy theory now rivals Holocaust deniers. Forty percent of Israel’s Arab population say the Holocaust never happened. The phenomenon is, understandably, more prevalent among those born since World War II. … “

There are other comparisons, of course. The number of Arabs who believe that Bush was the worst president in American history, for instance, also rivals Holocaust deniers, but for some reason wizened de Borchgrave doesn’t make that statistical comparison. Offhand, I’d say there are many more Arabs who believe that Black Tuesday was a domestic fascist covert operation, but de Borchgrave’s isn’t a rational argument – it’s mass libel – so if you can work in Holocaust denial somehow, pretend there’s some equivalence, you score propaganda points.

“Hasan is one of millions today who believe America and its Israeli ally are working in tandem to suppress Islam. … “

We are at war within several Islamic countries, and we’re bombing, killing. The business philosophy and lethal antics of Blackwater are suppressive. “Winning hearts and minds” is a euphemism for behavior modification. You might call all of this “suppressing” Islam, but that’s putting it mildly and it’s the wrong word.

Jacob Hornberger, president of the Future of Freedom foundation, cites American foreign policy – somehow 9/11 conspiracy theories receive no mention:

Foreign-Policy Blowback at Ft. Hood
by Jacob G. Hornberger

Amidst all the debate over whether the Ft. Hood killer is a terrorist, murderer, enemy combatant, traitor, sleeper agent, or insane person, there is one glaring fact staring America in the face: what happened at Ft. Hood is more blowback from U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, specifically the occupations of Iraq and Afghanistan. Even at this early stage of the investigation, the evidence is virtually conclusive that the accused killer, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, was motivated to kill U.S. soldiers at Ft. Hood by deep anger and rage arising from the things that the U.S. government has been doing to people in the Middle East for many years.
http://mwcnews.net/content/view/34337/26/

De Borchgrave never gets around to explaining what 9/11 Truth has to do with the slaughter at Ft. Hood – possible because Hasan was actually opposed to illicit wars, wayward drones; there hasn’t been a hint that 9/11 was a factor at all, let alone Israel – changes the subject to make his Holocaust denial point and then drifts off to make other important-sounding but entirely irrelevant excuses.

His rebuttal to the theories goes like this:

“Three can keep a secret if two of them are dead. A conspiracy on the scale of Sept. 11 would have required a lot more than three. … “

Never mind that de Borchgrave and his fellow Moonies manage to keep all sorts of secrets. The members of the cult, thousands of them, keep it to themselves that they are a branch of South Korean intelligence, that they are joined at the hip and temple with the CIA. Do they discuss this relationship openly? Naw. Neither does the press that shelters them from exposure as a fascist mind control cult. So that tin argument coming from de Borchgrave and a horde of other establishment pundits right and left (hear me, David Corn?), deserves to die, at long last. I roll my eyes every time I hear it.

Anyone making that argument is not worth a second thought – and this sums up my feelings about Arnaud de Moonie.

By Ray Hainer, Health.com | November 11, 2009

(Health.com) — Bisphenol-A, a chemical found in hard, clear plastic used to make everything from baby bottles to food packaging, may increase the risk of erectile dysfunction and other sexual problems in male factory workers exposed to large amounts of the substance, according to a study conducted in China. …

STORY

” … perhaps the most urgent question is this: why does President Obama continue to use this company? … “

For all the scandal, the mercenary firm has escaped any severe legal sanction. That could now change …

Jeremy Scahill
guardian.co.uk | 11 November 2009

The mercenary firm Blackwater has become a symbol of the utter lawlessness and criminality that permeates the privatised wing of the US war machine. The company’s operatives have shot dead scores of Iraqi and Afghan civilians, while former employees allege in sworn statements that Blackwater’s owner Erik Prince “views himself as a Christian crusader tasked with eliminating Muslims and the Islamic faith from the globe”, and that Prince’s companies “encouraged and rewarded the destruction of Iraqi life”. Five Blackwater employees will stand trial in federal court in the US on charges they slaughtered 14 innocent Iraqis, while a sixth Blackwater operative has already pleaded guilty. The company faces allegations of illicit weapons-smuggling and tax evasion, and is being sued for war crimes. The private army is under fire. And yet, despite all of the action, none of the legal bullets has – to date – landed a serious blow.

An explosive report in the New York Times today could change that. The paper alleges that in the aftermath of the infamous 2007 Nisour Square massacre, top Blackwater officials “authorised secret payments” of about $1m into Iraq intending to bribe Iraqi officials to allow Blackwater to remain in Iraq despite Baghdad’s position that the company would be banned and the killers prosecuted. Blackwater continued to operate in Iraq for a full two years after the Iraqis announced the company would be kicked out – a fact that has baffled and angered Iraqis. In fact, Blackwater remains in Iraq to this day on a $200m contract that was recently extended by the Obama administration. The new report, if true, could help explain why Blackwater has survived so long in Iraq. It could also be a window into what may become the most serious legal issue facing Prince and other executives.

The New York Times report claims that Prince was aware of the bribery scheme and that his deputy, company president Gary Jackson, directed the transfer of the money to Blackwater’s hub in Jordan, from where it was funneled to a top Blackwater manager in Iraq. Such actions would be illegal under US law. At the time of the alleged bribery scheme, FBI agents were on the ground in Baghdad conducting a criminal investigation of the incident and were, in part, relying on the cooperation of Iraqi officials, particularly from Iraq’s interior ministry, the alleged intended recipients. If true, that means that Blackwater or its executives could face charges of obstruction of justice.

There is a grand jury investigating Blackwater in its home state of North Carolina.

Blackwater swiftly denounced the story as “baseless”, while a former Blackwater official, CIA veteran Cofer Black, denied the New York Times claim he confronted Prince over the bribery. Jackson told the paper: “I don’t care what you write.”

Among the most serious issues raised by this scandal is who else may have been involved. Was Blackwater freelancing or was there government involvement? At the time of the alleged bribery plan, Blackwater worked hand-in-glove with the Bush administration and, at times, the two forces colluded. Following the Nisour Square massacre, evidence emerged of a clear pattern of the State Department urging Blackwater to pay what amounted to hush money to Iraqi victims’ families. “In cases involving the death of Iraqis, it appears that the State Department’s primary response was to ask Blackwater to make monetary payments to ‘put the matter behind us’, rather than to insist upon accountability or to investigate Blackwater personnel for potential criminal liability,” according to a report of the House Oversight Committee released in late 2007.

After a drunken Blackwater guard allegedly shot and killed an Iraqi bodyguard inside the Green Zone on Christmas Eve 2006, the Charge d’Affaires of the US embassy in Iraq initially suggested Blackwater make a $250,000 payment but the Department’s Diplomatic Security Service said this was too much and could cause Iraqis to “try to get killed so as to set up their family financially”. In the end, the State Department and Blackwater reportedly agreed on a $15,000 payment. During his Congressional testimony in October 2007, Erik Prince corrected that figure, saying Blackwater had actually paid $20,000. In another case, in al Hillah in June 2005, a Blackwater operator killed an “apparently innocent bystander” and the State Department requested that Blackwater pay the family $5,000. “Can you tell me how it was determined that this man’s life was worth $5,000?” Representative Danny Davis asked Prince when he appeared before the US Congress. “We don’t determine that value, sir,” Prince responded. “That’s kind of an Iraqi-wide policy. We don’t make that one.”

After Nisour Square, the Iraqi government eventually demanded $8 million in compensation for each victim. In the end, the State Department, on behalf of Blackwater, offered family members between $10,000-12,500, which many of them refused.

Blackwater and the US State Department had a mutual interest in keeping the company in Iraq. The company provided the elite bodyguards for occupation officials and when Blackwater stopped work for three days after Nisour Square, those officials could not leave their fortress in the Green Zone. For Blackwater, the contract meant big money–more than $1 billion. In the aftermath of Nisour Square, then-Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and other officials basically read the riot act to Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and Blackwater was back to business in Iraq on the fourth day after the massacre and remains in the country. After Nisour Square, one US diplomat described the relationship between the US Embassy’s security office in Baghdad and Blackwater. “They draw the wagon circle,” the diplomat said. “They protect each other. They look out for each other. I don’t know if that’s a good thing, that wall of silence. When it protects the guilty, that is definitely not a good thing.”

While the Bush administration certainly protected Blackwater after Nisour Square, part of the reason for the alleged or attempted bribes may be this: as the US and Iraq negotiated the Status of Forces Agreement and the Iraqi government attempted to impose more authority over private military companies, the stakes got higher for Blackwater. An official licence to operate in Iraq, which Blackwater did not have and long believed was an unnecessary formality, became crucial for Blackwater in order to continue on as the State Department’s prime contractor. To many Iraqis, Blackwater’s continued presence was a stark symbol of the country’s lack of sovereignty. It is an incredible fact that Blackwater has remained as long as it has in the country given the severity and extent of its alleged crimes and the rhetoric from Iraqi political figures about the company. It was not until March 2009 that the Iraqi government announced it would not extend Blackwater an operating licence. In May 2009, Blackwater’s prime contract was awarded to competitor Triple Canopy, but a downsized Blackwater remains armed in Iraq. And the company continues to do robust business with the US government elsewhere.

Today, Blackwater works in Afghanistan for the State Department, the CIA and the Defence Department. It protects US officials there and guards visiting Congressional delegations. Democratic Representative Jan Schakowsky, a close friend of President Obama, says she was guarded by Blackwater on a recent trip to Afghanistan and that the company is involved with the security details of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Ambassador Richard Holbrooke when they visit the country. But as the investigations into Blackwater deepen and the scandals expand, perhaps the most urgent question is this: why does President Obama continue to use this company?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2009/nov/11/blackwater-mercenary-scandal-legal-sanction

www.huffingtonpost.com | November 5, 2009

… The new documentary from Academy Award-winning director Barry Levinson, Poliwood examines the intersection of politics and the entertainment industry. It follows several members of the “Creative Coalition” as they travel to both the Democratic and Republican national conventions in 2008. They waltzed in through the front door, with cameras and no hidden agenda. Everybody saw them.

Then there’s Matthew Marsden, furtive thespian.

Last month, the handsome co-star of movies like Black Hawk Down, Rambo (2008 edition) and Transformers: Revenge Of The Fallen, appeared at a secret, far-right conclave in liberal Austin, Texas. How secret? It wasn’t even listed on the hotel’s public calendar.

The sponsor was an outfit called the Council for National Policy. According to a 2007 story in the New York Times, the conservative group was “founded 25 years ago by the Rev. Tim LaHaye as a forum for conservative Christians to strategize about turning the country to the right.” LaHaye was then-head of Jerry Falwell’s “Moral Majority,” and is co-author of the popular Left Behind series that predicts and then depicts the biblical Apocalypse from the specious Book of Revelation.

The council’s website is cryptic in the extreme, not listing members or staff, only speeches after-the-fact. News coverage informs us that bylaws of the sneaky society forbid patrons from publicly disclosing its membership or activities.

Nonetheless, participants at the Austin event were smoked out by the local American-Statesman newspaper. Culled from a hall of fame “who’s who” of the modern far-right movement, they included George Gilder, co-founder of Seattle’s Discovery Institute, which promotes the teaching of Intelligent Design (a fancy term for creationism); Phyllis Schlafly, founder of the Eagle Forum; James Dobson, fundamentalist founder of Colorado-based Focus on the Family; and Edwin Meese, the former U.S. attorney general under Ronald Reagan who positively hates the Supreme Court’s 1966 Miranda ruling. (Full disclosure: I hate meeses to pieces, too.)

The Statesman‘s reporter wrote that his entry to the festivities was barred, and that “functionaries” even broke up his hallway interviews. He went on to describe the Hollywood hotshot who appeared in the midst of this nutty gaggle:

“Movie actor Matthew Marsden was asked if he gives speeches. ‘I feel like I’m going to,’ he said.” What drew Marsden to the scene? “A sidekick marching {him} away replied: ‘Americans want to see family-friendly movies.'”


That’s quite the disingenuous response, of course, considering Marsden has no history of support for such things. Furthermore, several of his film projects have been rated R, while the recent Transformers, according to its listing on IMDb, was rated PG-13 “for intense sequences of sci-fi action violence, language, crude and sexual material, and brief drug material.” Family-friendly?

There are certainly popular entertainers with a conservative bent, some more bent than others. Jon Voight, for example, a great actor on occasion, doesn’t hide his opinions. He’s gone off the deep end in front of us for years. Just this week, he appeared with Tim Pawlenty in Minnesota, telling the crowd that President Obama is “causing civil unrest in this country….taking away God’s first gift to man: our free will.” Thursday, Voight appeared with Dobson henchman Tony Perkins at a rally in Washington hosted by the certifiable Michelle Bachmann.

Times have changed. Charlton Heston, who headed the NRA in his later years, didn’t spew bizarre religious-right screeds like, say, has-beens Pat Boone and Chuck Norris now do regularly. Heston wasn’t a lunatic, and neither, one senses, are conservatives such as Clint Eastwood, Bruce Willis, or Gary Sinise. (The jury, however, is still out on Mel Gibson.)

Director Levinson has noted in interviews for his documentary that most stars don’t take public stands on hot button issues because it’s generally not a wise career move, especially for those still climbing the ladder. It can offend half of the potential ticket-buying audience. Perhaps this explains Marsden’s masked and anonymous approach to civic involvement.

Still, he obviously didn’t appear at this unpublicized meeting of the far-right by chance, thousands of miles from the east and west coast media meccas.

If Matthew Marsden is really honored to hang out with anti-gay, religious-right hate mongers — and that’s who he flew halfway across the country to be with in private — then he should do it in the light of day.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jackson-williams/hollywood-actor-matthew-m_b_347930.html